Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 23:42:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://911gallery.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-28T144735.431-150x150.png Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ 32 32 Last week tonight, the John Oliver Masterpieces Gallery at the Cartoon Art Museum in San Francisco – January 11, 2022 https://911gallery.org/last-week-tonight-the-john-oliver-masterpieces-gallery-at-the-cartoon-art-museum-in-san-francisco-january-11-2022/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 23:42:43 +0000 https://911gallery.org/last-week-tonight-the-john-oliver-masterpieces-gallery-at-the-cartoon-art-museum-in-san-francisco-january-11-2022/ Tue January 11 – Tue January 25, 2022 The Cartoon Art Museum is pleased to announce that it will host a public exhibition of The Last Week Tonight Masterpiece gallery in January thanks to the generous sponsorship of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. The Last Week Tonight Masterpiece Gallery will complete its nationwide tour […]]]>

Tue January 11 – Tue January 25, 2022

The Cartoon Art Museum is pleased to announce that it will host a public exhibition of The Last Week Tonight Masterpiece gallery in January thanks to the generous sponsorship of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. The Last Week Tonight Masterpiece Gallery will complete its nationwide tour in San Francisco at the Cartoon Art Museum as part of John Oliver’s efforts to showcase his unique art collection and showcase museums that have been affected by the global pandemic. The Cartoon Art Museum received a donation of $ 10,000 from last week tonight with John Oliver to facilitate the exhibit, and the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank will receive a matching donation of $ 10,000.

The three works on display in the Masterpiece Gallery include a painting of talk show host Wendy Williams preparing to eat a lamb chop; a still life of ties painted by Judy Kudlow, wife of Fox Business Network host Larry Kudlow, and Stay Up Late, a painting by Pennsylvania-based artist Brian Swords, which depicts two anthropomorphized rats engaged in an act that has inspired Oliver to proclaim the piece “High Quality Rat Erotica.”

The Cartoon Art Museum is pleased to announce that it will host a public exhibition of The Last Week Tonight Masterpiece gallery in January thanks to the generous sponsorship of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. The Last Week Tonight Masterpiece Gallery will complete its nationwide tour in San Francisco at the Cartoon Art Museum as part of John Oliver’s efforts to showcase his unique art collection and showcase museums that have been affected by the global pandemic. The Cartoon Art Museum received a donation of $ 10,000 from last week tonight with John Oliver to facilitate the exhibit, and the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank will receive a matching donation of $ 10,000.

The three works on display in the Masterpiece Gallery include a painting of talk show host Wendy Williams preparing to eat a lamb chop; a still life of ties painted by Judy Kudlow, wife of Fox Business Network host Larry Kudlow, and Stay Up Late, a painting by Pennsylvania-based artist Brian Swords, which depicts two anthropomorphized rats engaged in an act that has inspired Oliver to proclaim the piece “High Quality Rat Erotica.”

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On the bright side: Fenimore Art Museum launches series of virtual tours throughout winter | Local news https://911gallery.org/on-the-bright-side-fenimore-art-museum-launches-series-of-virtual-tours-throughout-winter-local-news/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:39:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/on-the-bright-side-fenimore-art-museum-launches-series-of-virtual-tours-throughout-winter-local-news/ The Fenimore Art Museum will present four virtual tours focused on the museum’s collections. According to a press release, the tours will run from 2 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays from January 18 to March 8 and will be via Zoom. The full program and tour descriptions can be found on FenimoreArt.org. Fenimore offers […]]]>

The Fenimore Art Museum will present four virtual tours focused on the museum’s collections.

According to a press release, the tours will run from 2 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays from January 18 to March 8 and will be via Zoom. The full program and tour descriptions can be found on FenimoreArt.org.

Fenimore offers free virtual tours, but asks viewers to consider donating – $ 10 is suggested. Those interested can reserve a seat on one or all of the tours on Eventbrite.com. Links to register can be found at FenimoreArt.org.

Virtual tours include:

• “Cooper, Cole and the Hudson River School”, a tour via Zoom of the collections related to writer James Fenimore Cooper, artist Thomas Cole and the Hudson River School. It will be narrated live on January 18 and February 22. According to the statement, Cooper and Cole were friends “whose works inspired a love for the sublime American landscape.” Assistant Curator Ann Cannon will lead the tour of the museum’s collection featuring memorabilia from the Cooper family, as well as a variety of paintings by Cole and other key members of the Hudson River School.

• “Highlights of American Folk Art”, a tour via Zoom of selections from Fenimore’s folk art collection. Narrated live on January 25 and February 15. The tour will feature “some of the most important names in folk art such as Anna Mary Robertson (Grandma Moses), Edward Hicks, Ralph Fasanella and more,” the statement said. It will include an overview of 19th century portraits, sculptures, traditional crafts and more. The 20-minute virtual tour will be followed by a live question-and-answer session with Kevin Gray, Arts Education Manager.

• “Thaw Collection of American Indian Art”, a tour via Zoom of the highlights of the Thaw Collection of American Indian Art. It will be told live on February 1 and March 1. According to the statement, the museum’s Thaw Collection of American Indian Art “showcases incredible examples of Native American art, craftsmanship and ingenuity from across North America.” Basketry, masks, weapons, clothing, ceramics, weavings and more, spanning dozens of cultures and hundreds of years, are on display in the Thaw Gallery. Assistant Curator Julia Madore will lead the tour. A question-and-answer session will follow.

• “Elegant New York – Historical Garments Made in New York”, a virtual tour via Zoom of Fenimore’s “Elegant New York” exhibition, will be narrated live on February 8 and March 8. According to the statement, “Elegant New York displays the taste and elegance of the inhabitants and dressmakers of New York City and upstate in the 19th and early 20th centuries, a trend that made the city ​​a national and global fashion center. ” New York City, home to many of the wealthiest families in 19th and early 20th century America, had its own high-end fashion establishments “which could compete with internationally renowned fashion houses,” according to the press release. Even the small towns and villages of the state supported dozens of small seamstresses, whose work often met very high standards. The virtual tour of the exhibition will be led by Cassidy Percoco, Collections Manager at the Fenimore Art Museum and the Farmers’ Museum. She will host a live question-and-answer session after the 20-minute tour.


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Missoula Art Museum Auction: See Art In Person, Bid Online | Arts & Theater https://911gallery.org/missoula-art-museum-auction-see-art-in-person-bid-online-arts-theater/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/missoula-art-museum-auction-see-art-in-person-bid-online-arts-theater/ View the art in person, then bid online before and during a virtual event. This is the model for the 2022 benefit art auction at the Missoula Art Museum. The exhibit features 82 pieces, with renowned Montana artists everywhere – Beth Lo, Monte Dolack, Hadley Ferguson, Stephanie Frostad and more, alongside emerging artists and new […]]]>

View the art in person, then bid online before and during a virtual event.

This is the model for the 2022 benefit art auction at the Missoula Art Museum.

The exhibit features 82 pieces, with renowned Montana artists everywhere – Beth Lo, Monte Dolack, Hadley Ferguson, Stephanie Frostad and more, alongside emerging artists and new names. As in years past, this is one of the most diverse exhibitions they’ve hosted, said associate curator John Calsbeek.

Mediums and genres range from landscape to portraits and abstraction in painting, drawing, textiles, ceramics and things you may never have heard of before – see Christine Joy’s sculpture from ‘a stone wrapped in woven grass.

Last year the auction was virtual and they did not show the work for logistical reasons, which they remedied this year.

“We really wanted to do a physical exhibit this year, in part because it’s a chance to honor artists and work with artists from our community,” said Brandon Reintjes, Senior Curator of MAM. Although the art is visible online, the scale and detail often does not translate.

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The show opens in the Carnegie Galleries, its largest space, on Friday, January 7, but MAM won’t be open late for the art walk. You can stop during regular hours, Tuesday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The auction itself is a virtual event on Saturday February 5th. It is usually held in person with hundreds of people in attendance in the varsity center ballroom, with a boisterous atmosphere mixed with food and drink and performers and supporters from across the state.

Going back to virtual was “a necessity,” said Laura Millin, executive director of MAM. This year, they aim to create a “bigger and more dynamic live event” based on the experience of last year. It will be an hour, with a live auction of 10 items and more produced segments.

Last year, they raised $ 98,000 for programming, which includes local, regional and national contemporary art exhibits throughout the year. This includes the Frost Gallery, which is devoted exclusively to contemporary Indigenous art. The museum is also free and introduces hundreds of local children to the art through its fifth grade art experience.

Art

The show still has a community feel, so residents of Missoula will see longtime creators.

Members of the Pattee Canyon Ladies’ Salon have contributed pieces – you’ll see works by Stephanie Frostad, Kristi Hager, Nancy Erickson and Leslie Van Stavern Millar.

In Hadley Ferguson’s painting “Late Evening Sky Over Calm Waters” (acrylic on clay board), a rich sky overlooks mountains and a river. Ferguson’s large-scale murals include the Montana Women’s Mural at the State Capitol.

One of the first exhibitors is Bonnie Tarses, a textile designer and weaver well known in the city for her scarves. She made an untitled multimedia piece with dyed silk tightly tied around squares, like an abstract chessboard pattern.

Dave Thomas, an abstract painter from Idaho, has a piece dominated by three impastos that rise from the paper like cake frosting – an example of how works read differently in person compared to online.

Todd Forsgren donated a photograph, “Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra),” a highly detailed photo of the red-orange bird in a net. (According to his website, this is part of a series in which birds are captured in mist nets by researchers to temporarily take their weights and measurements.) Art professor and gallery director at Rocky Mountain College in Billings , he published his work in points of sale. like National Geographic, The Guardian and more.

A rare matched lot brings together pieces from artists who helped bring modernism to Montana. It includes a stoneware bowl by Frances Senska and a silkscreen print by her partner, Jessie Wilbur. Senska taught at Montana State University and included Rudy Autio and Peter Voulkos among her students. Reintjes said their importance to art history “far exceeds” their national labor market or even their local knowledge.

The landscape is present through many mediums. MSU professor Gesine Jenzen donated a three-tone woodcut of a forest scene at close range, with careful delineation of the trees as they recede. UM professor Steve Krutek rendered a dense forest scene in charcoal that reminded Calsbeek of Lee Friedlander’s large format black and white forest scenes. Sheila Miles, a longtime Montana artist now based in the southwest, contributed to “The Top of Fall,” a classic mountain lake scene that draws on her long history of working in abstraction.

A number of pieces have been donated by Matrix Press to the School of Art and Media at the University of Montana. The Print Lab and MAM have a partnership that brings guest artists to Missoula to produce new work with the help of instructors and UM students, and then exhibit at MAM.

A monotype by Oregon artist Lillian Pitt (Wasco, Warm Springs, Yakama) features images that will be familiar to those who saw her popular 2019-2020 MAM exhibit, in which a mask submerged in the waters gazes out pass fish. Neal Ambrose-Smith, whose exhibition “Where are you going?” Is still on view, collaborated on a print with Jason Clark and James Bailey of The Matrix, in which each artist contributed their own distinctive imagery.

Millin said she likes to remember that the first auction was held to start the museum.

“Really, artists for the first supporters, the first patrons, the first donors to the effort through this auction and they have been doing it ever since.”

Artists donate pieces on a share percentage, so the money goes to the artists as well.

Virtual auction

The auction takes place on Saturday 5 February at 6 p.m. It’s free. Go to missoulaartmuseum.org, where you can view all articles now, see key dates, and find more information on how to bid.

This year’s auction includes 10 items that will be auctioned live during the virtual auction. The remaining pieces, for a total of 82, are split into two silent auction sections that end at 8 p.m. on Saturday, February 5 and 5 p.m. on Sunday, February 6.

The live event will last for an hour, with longtime auctioneer Johanna Wells on board live from the gallery. All 10 coins will be auctioned on a tight deadline to encourage bidding wars. They are recording a few videos ahead of time to give the impression of high production compared to last year.

There are two sections of silent auction coins. From January 23 to 27, there is a ‘buy it now’ option (with a premium), before the auction opens on January 28.

On auction night, the first silent auction lot ends at 8 p.m. and the second lot ends the next day, February 6, at 5 p.m.

While going virtual was not ideal, MAM has been cautious with all of its events during the pandemic.

“We really hope we can restore this next year,” said Millin. “Not just the auction, but the MAM – and all of its events and functions. We are all so terribly deprived… and desperate for human contact. And that’s what art needs. Art needs people to see it and see it together and we miss the joy of that. But what do we do? We advance, we persevere.

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Art museum, developer partner of a new artist-in-residence program at the Montrose Collective https://911gallery.org/art-museum-developer-partner-of-a-new-artist-in-residence-program-at-the-montrose-collective/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/art-museum-developer-partner-of-a-new-artist-in-residence-program-at-the-montrose-collective/ The Houston Museum of Contemporary Art and developer Radom Capital are teaming up with a new residency program that officials say will bring together 25 merchants, chefs and wellness concepts at the Montrose Collective’s development in Houston. (Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Houston) The Houston Museum of Contemporary Art and developer Radom Capital […]]]>

The Houston Museum of Contemporary Art and developer Radom Capital are teaming up with a new residency program that officials say will bring together 25 merchants, chefs and wellness concepts at the Montrose Collective’s development in Houston. (Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Houston)

The Houston Museum of Contemporary Art and developer Radom Capital are teaming up with a new residency program that officials say will bring together 25 merchants, chefs and wellness concepts at the Montrose Collective’s development in Houston.

The program, which was announced in a January 3 press release but started in mid-December, is designed to support artists by allowing the museum to expand its existing artist-in-residence program known as from CAMHLAB, which supports artists in a variety of formats in their quest to bring new projects to the public.

“This is an opportunity for artists to not only go beyond the walls of the museum, but also to directly share their creative process with the public,” CAMH Managing Director Hesse McGraw said in a statement.

Four artists have been selected for the first iteration of the program, according to the Jan.3 press release.

  • Eepi Chaad: Chaad’s project, Soft Space, was the first to be presented in mid-December. The installation celebrates the soft surfaces associated with homes, according to a description provided by CAMH. Visitors can engage and also participate in the process of creating a space transformed from the squares of textile, such as handkerchiefs, bandanas, scarves, afghans, plaids and security blankets.
  • Two Star Symphony: The artist collective Two Star Symphony will take over the space in February and March, creating new performances and sound works. The group will offer regular studio hours of operation to make the process more visible, according to CAMH. Plans include a collaboration with puppeteer Afsaneh Aayani and composing new scores for short films from the avant-garde film collection “Unseen Cinema”.
  • Frame dance: Frame Dance will present a project called “The Family Mantra” from March 30 to May 15, described as “a performance that explores generational psychological changes in the Houston community”. The group will host family dance parties in an effort to bond and create creative expression, according to CAMH. The Frame Dance MultiGen Ensemble, a group of all ages and abilities, will also use the space as well as their professional dance company.
  • Dana caldera: Caldera’s project, titled ‘From Paper to Tissue’, will develop the artist’s layered, collage-based artwork by removing the constraints of a traditional stretched canvas and exploring the intersection of the quilting and gluing, according to CAMH. The residency will include a community sewing circle event, which aims to provide a place for the community as well as organize for political or social causes. Caldera will occupy the space in June.

Montrose Collective is developed by Radom Capital. In addition to the 25 artists, the site will also house office tenants and the library of the Freed-Montrose district. The CAMHLAB gallery is free to the public, Steve Radom, Managing Director of Radom Capital, said in a statement.

CAMHLAB was launched in fall 2020 to help Houston artists stay afloat during the coronavirus pandemic by finding ways to safely connect them with audiences.

“We live in wild times and the world is a strange place these days,” Chaad said in a statement. “CAMHLAB makes room for artists to process and perform. Each residency is like a capsule of a moment during an extraordinary period of acceleration in human chronology.


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McNay Art Museum exhibition pays tribute to Californian artist Wayne Thiebaud, who died on December 25 at the age of 101 https://911gallery.org/mcnay-art-museum-exhibition-pays-tribute-to-californian-artist-wayne-thiebaud-who-died-on-december-25-at-the-age-of-101/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 16:53:50 +0000 https://911gallery.org/mcnay-art-museum-exhibition-pays-tribute-to-californian-artist-wayne-thiebaud-who-died-on-december-25-at-the-age-of-101/ For curator René Paul Barilleaux, the exhibition “Wayne Thiebaud 100: Paintings, Prints and Drawings” at the McNay Art Museum captures the late artist’s passion for his work. “On my tours, I say subjects are an excuse for making beautiful paintings,” said Barilleaux, McNay’s curatorial affairs manager. “He loves to paint on canvas – you can […]]]>

For curator René Paul Barilleaux, the exhibition “Wayne Thiebaud 100: Paintings, Prints and Drawings” at the McNay Art Museum captures the late artist’s passion for his work.

“On my tours, I say subjects are an excuse for making beautiful paintings,” said Barilleaux, McNay’s curatorial affairs manager. “He loves to paint on canvas – you can tell it’s something he loves, the act of painting. To me, you don’t see the work in the work. It just seems effortless.

Thiebaud died at his home in Sacramento, California on Christmas Day. He was 101 years old.

“Even at 101, he still spent most of his days in the studio, driven by, as he described it with his characteristic humility,” that almost neurotic fixation of trying to learn to paint, “” a statement said from Thiebaud’s gallery, Acquavella.

The traveling exhibition, which can be viewed until January 16 at the McNay, was curated by the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento to mark Thiebaud’s centenary. The McNay also features a companion exhibit exploring the friendship between him and fellow artist Beth Van Hoesen.

“Wayne Thiebaud 100” comprises 100 works, including the sumptuous desserts for which he was known. In his images of cakes, pies and ice cream, the paint is applied as if they were generously proportioned spoonfuls of frosting or meringue.

“What he’s so good at is taking mundane, everyday things and elevating them to that almost iconic or religious feel,” Barilleaux said. “He isolates something, he presents it in a very frontal, almost theatrical way, giving it this great importance, and imbues it with this quality that transcends everyday life.

This gives Thiebaud’s work a timeless quality, he said.

“It won’t look outdated, it won’t be associated with a particular decade or movement,” he said. “I think he’s a recognized force in the art world. He said he had overcome so many trends and so many artistic fashions and artistic trends and maintained his own vision until the very end.

The New York Times obituary for Thiebaud specifically noted the passion for his work that Barilleaux mentions when he guides visitors through the exhibit. The story ended with a quote from the artist: “It has never ceased to move and amaze me, the magic of what happens when you put a piece of paint next to it. another.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

dlmartin@express-news.net | Twitter: @DeborahMartinFR


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From the White House to America’s premier museum of modern art – Washington, DC as an artistic destination https://911gallery.org/from-the-white-house-to-americas-premier-museum-of-modern-art-washington-dc-as-an-artistic-destination/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 13:45:39 +0000 https://911gallery.org/from-the-white-house-to-americas-premier-museum-of-modern-art-washington-dc-as-an-artistic-destination/ This 2020 photograph of the holiday decorations on display in the Vermeil Room of the White House was taken on … [+] November 30, 2020. Above the mantle, the 1966 painting “Resurrection” by artist Alma Thomas is on display. Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association. © 2020 White House Historical Association. With all […]]]>

With all it’s known for, Washington, DC can easily be overlooked as a top destination for art lovers. From the National Gallery of Art to the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, via the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art, the Philips Collection – America’s first museum of modern art – the Howard University Gallery of Art and of course all the sculptures and monuments to be found throughout the city, forget the politicians and lobbyists, many of the nation’s greatest artists are moving to Washington, DC

Another extraordinary art collection in the nation’s capital belongs to the White House. Some 60,000 objects ranging from decorative arts and furniture to painting and sculpture are in his possession.

While each administration greatly customizes the items on display in the upstairs family living quarters and in the Oval Office, the layout of the downstairs and first floors remains largely the same, at discretion. of the president and the first lady.

Seeing these works in person requires careful planning.

For U.S. citizens, requests to participate in a public tour of the White House must go through each visitor’s member of Congress at least 21 days in advance. Additional time should be allowed to avoid scheduling conflicts and stockouts. Non-US citizens interested in a visit should contact their embassy in Washington, DC. Find a full list of requirements for making a public tour of the White House here.

For those who succeed, there is a must-see piece in the Vermeil room on the ground floor: “Resurrection” by Alma Thomas.

This radiant expression of bright color became the first painting of an African-American woman to enter the White House collection when it was acquired in 2015.

The acquisitions of new White House exhibits are a collaborative effort between the First Lady, the Committee for the Preservation of the White House, the White House Historical Association, and the White House Office of the Curator. The Curator’s Office collects and preserves objects from the White House collection, maintaining them to museum standards. It is the responsibility of the Historical Association to provide an interpretation of all of this to the public.

As part of its educational mission, the White House Historical Association has developed a 360-degree virtual tour of the Executive Mansion over the past year, as tours have been reduced due to COVID-19. An even more recent project sheds new light on slavery in the White House and surrounding neighborhoods.

The organization, founded in 1961 by Jackie Kennedy, also works extensively with school groups, produces its own podcast, and raises funds to support its mission of protecting, preserving and providing public access to the building’s history. One way to do this is to order an official White House Christmas decoration each year.

Beyond “Resurrection” at the White House, the Phillips Collection currently offers a unique opportunity to see the work of Thomas (1891-1978) in volume. Longtime DC resident and educator receives full retrospective during “Alma Thomas: Everything is Beautiful” through January 23, 2022. This comprehensive overview of her extraordinary career includes 50 paintings spanning the period 1922-1977, as well as puppets , costume designs, prints made with her students and her sculpture long before her mid-1960s ‘Alma’s Stripes’ breakthrough for which she became famous.

Around Washington, DC

Not only does the Phillips Collection present a historic exhibit for Howard University graduate Thomas, but also another Howard graduate: David Driskell (1931-2020). “David Driskell: Icons of Nature and History”, presented until January 9, 2022, brings together around 60 of his works. Overshadowed by his career as one of America’s foremost art historians, educators, and curators, Driskell’s artistic creation takes center stage here, and what a treat it is – joyful, sensitive, expressive, vibrant, narrative.

Photographer James Van Der Zee has compiled an extraordinary chronicle of Harlem in the 1920s and 1930s, a body of work on display until May 22, 2022 at the National Gallery of Art during the exhibition “Photos of James Van Der Zee : a portrait of Harlem ”.

“James Van Der Zee created an intimate, festive and rich portrait of African American life in Harlem in the first half of the 20e century, ”said Diane Wagoner, curator of 19th century photographs at the National Gallery, in this video. “His sensitive studio portraits presented a prosperous and cosmopolitan take on black modernity.”

The National Gallery shares this view through 40 works in its collection showcasing Van Der Zee’s studio portraits as well as his photographs of Harlem nightclubs and storefronts, religious, social, political and sporting community groups. His carefully composed photographs reflected the personality, aspirations and spirit of his models.

A huge treasure trove of Van Der Zee’s images – tens of thousands of photos and negatives – was jointly acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Studio Museum of Harlem earlier this month, ensuring further attention for this underrated artist.

A home for the future curious, the Smithsonian’s Arts and Industries Building reopened in November for the first time since 2004 after undergoing a massive renovation. He did so with the building-wide exhibit, “FUTURES”. As part of the fun, visitors can talk directly to the future and have real-time holographic conversations across the globe with residents of Doha, Qatar.

Passers-by from a twin portal site in Msheireb district in Doha, Qatar, are connected to those in DC, allowing participants from each location a unique opportunity for cultural exchange.

“The holocapsule will connect Americans and Qataris like never before, serving as a symbol of our commitment to continue the dialogue among our nations,” said HE Meshal Bin Hamad Al-Thani, Ambassador of the State of Qatar to the United States. .

For overnight stays in Washington, unless you are invited to stay at the Bidens, consider booking at the Kimpton Banneker Hotel.

The Banneker takes its name from Benjamin Banneker, an inventor, mathematician, and astronomer born to a free African-American woman and former slave father in 1731. Among countless notable accomplishments, he helped study what would become the city, establishing its meridian line, now 16e Street along which the hotel is located.


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What’s the perfect gift for an art museum? A rare baroque drawing https://911gallery.org/whats-the-perfect-gift-for-an-art-museum-a-rare-baroque-drawing/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 10:00:59 +0000 https://911gallery.org/whats-the-perfect-gift-for-an-art-museum-a-rare-baroque-drawing/ I am delighted to share with you all, on Boxing Day, a beautiful drawing that has just entered the collection as part of a generous end-of-year donation of 36 European and American drawings from collectors John and Sylvie O’Brien. The drawing was made by the Italian Baroque artist Sassoferrato (Giovanni Battista Salvi 1609-1685 – known […]]]>

I am delighted to share with you all, on Boxing Day, a beautiful drawing that has just entered the collection as part of a generous end-of-year donation of 36 European and American drawings from collectors John and Sylvie O’Brien.

The drawing was made by the Italian Baroque artist Sassoferrato (Giovanni Battista Salvi 1609-1685 – known by his birthplace of Sassoferrato, a small town between Florence and Rome). The name may be familiar to some of you as he is the artist responsible for the image of Saint Lucia that we highlighted during our summer exhibition Bernini & the Roman Baroque: Masterpieces from Palazzo Chigi in Ariccia.

How delicious that Hagerstown now has a Sassoferrato of its own!

Sassoferrato made a consciously retrograde art. Although he lived entirely in the era defined as the Baroque period, Sassoferrato drew inspiration from the idealized beauty of Renaissance master Raphael (1483-1520) rather than the drama and theatricality characteristic of art. baroque.

His designs are relatively rare and most of those known are in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle. They were purchased in Rome in 1768 by Richard Dalton, librarian to George III and adviser for the constitution of the collection of drawings of the king.

Sassoferrato was known to often derive his compositions directly from Raphael’s work, and in this case his drawing is based on Raphael’s Madonna & Child (circa 1509), now in the National Gallery in London, sometimes referred to as the Mackintosh Madonna.

Raphael is associated with beautiful humanistic depictions of the Madonna and Child Jesus – images in which the Madonna appears more like a real mother, and the tender relationship between mother and child is captured. You can see this influence and tradition in this pretty sheet of Sassoferrato.

Study for the Madonna and Child, ca. 1650 Pencil on blue paper, Giovanni Battista Salvi (called, “il Sassoferrato,” Italian, 1609‒1685). Gift of John and Sylvie O’Brien, this drawing is now part of the collection of the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts.

It was the Renaissance painting that started it all: Raphael's Madonna and Child (The Virgin Mackintosh).  The painting is the property of the National Gallery, London.

It was Renaissance painting that started it all: Raphael’s Madonna and Child (The Virgin Mackintosh). The painting is the property of the National Gallery, London.

Sassoferrato, represented in this self-portrait, was inspired by Renaissance works.  Self-portrait, c.  1650. Oil on canvas, Uffizi Gallery, Collection of self-portraits, Florence.

Sassoferrato, represented in this self-portrait, was inspired by Renaissance works. Self-portrait, c. 1650. Oil on canvas, Uffizi Gallery, Collection of self-portraits, Florence.

This painting from Sassoferrato's studio is in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and appears to be based on the drawing which is now part of the WCFMA collection.  Virgin and Child, c.  1650-1700.

This painting from Sassoferrato’s studio is in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and appears to be based on the drawing which is now part of the WCFMA collection. Virgin and Child, c. 1650-1700.

The Virgin and Child by Sassoferrato, ca.  1650, is based on the drawing now in the WCMFA collection.  This oil on canvas is part of the collection of the Borghese Gallery, Rome.

The Virgin and Child by Sassoferrato, ca. 1650, is based on the drawing now in the WCMFA collection. This oil on canvas is part of the collection of the Borghese Gallery, Rome.

Sassoferrato’s oil paintings are characterized by their impeccable and neat finish, clarity and sense of color. You can barely see a brush stroke. Here, in graphite on blue paper, we get a much stronger sense of real life than what is typical in his paintings.

Mother Love

In this soft and serene composition, Marie is tender, thoughtful and slightly sad. Often, artists would add a suggestion of sadness to Mary’s expression to show that she was aware of her child’s plight.

The artist has put all his skills at the service of beauty and harmony – yet we feel the movement and the weight, and the baby himself feels very real; he is gently natural, expressive and affectionate.

The design has a beautiful softness in its execution, with a subtle modeling which conveys the roundness of the chubby baby and the texture of his skin. The child’s parted lips are a wonderful detail, capturing the evanescence of the facial expression.

The relationship between mother and child is emphasized through the composition itself. The two figures together form a triangle or pyramid, a style of composition often favored by Renaissance artists to create a stable and unified composition.

The only small area of ​​the composition that isn’t as successful in the drawing is the child’s bent leg – Mary grabs her foot – but the curvature of the leg shows the artist grappling with position and perspective.

Artists used drawings to solve composition and perspective problems, or as part of the thought process to fill a commission. Here, the design has been squared for transfer, meaning that the artist has drawn a grid over the composition to allow him to accurately transfer it to the larger size of the canvas.

The detail of Sassoferrato’s drawing and the fact that it is squared indicate that it was used as a source for a painting, and we are fortunate in this case to know that the painting was identified in the collection of the Borghese Gallery. in Rome. Another painting attributed to Sassoferrato’s studio with a similar composition is in the collection of the Rijksmuseum.

Sassoferrato began his artistic education with his father, Tarquinio Salvi, a painter about whom very little is known. Sassoferrato has made a specialty of creating beautiful devotional images for private patrons – often images of the Madonna and Child or images of the Madonna in prayer.

Most of her designs are highly finished and squared for transfer like ours. Because he worked to satisfy the tastes of his patrons, he often produced several versions of the same work or variations of compositions. The drawings could therefore have been used to facilitate the execution of several jobs.

Whatever your personal religious beliefs, one of the enduring attractions of depictions of the Virgin and Child is the way they capture and celebrate the power of the bond between mother and child – love, tenderness and the safety of a mother’s arms, the possibility and hope embodied in a new life, and the knowledge that these days are precious.

Sassoferrato captures all of this with exquisite softness and grace in this design that we are proud to add to the museum’s collection.

This article originally appeared on The Herald-Mail: Rare Drawing Among New Gifts at Washington County Museum of Fine Arts


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New Princeton University Art Museum building under construction https://911gallery.org/new-princeton-university-art-museum-building-under-construction/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 20:18:19 +0000 https://911gallery.org/new-princeton-university-art-museum-building-under-construction/ Roughly doubling the footprint of the existing facility, the 13,378 m2 (144,000 sf) facility increases exhibition, learning and visitor convenience spaces. Photo courtesy of Princeton University Construction has begun on the new Princeton University Art Museum, a new building that will move to the site of the old museum in the center of the Princeton […]]]>

Roughly doubling the footprint of the existing facility, the 13,378 m2 (144,000 sf) facility increases exhibition, learning and visitor convenience spaces. Photo courtesy of Princeton University

Construction has begun on the new Princeton University Art Museum, a new building that will move to the site of the old museum in the center of the Princeton campus.

Roughly double the area of ​​the existing installation, the 13,378 m2 (144,000 square feet) increases exhibition, learning and convenience spaces for visitors. The exterior of the building will be characterized by stone surfaces responding to the campus environment, as well as bronze detailing throughout.

The building has been designed in “zones” to allow maximum access to the most “public” parts of the facility – gathering spaces, educational and event spaces, a café – while ensuring appropriate controls over the main area of ​​the building. gallery on the second level. Four of the pavilions will have mechanically operated natural lighting and 5 m (18 ft) ceilings; other galleries will be shaped for more experiences and the display of other works, such as the museum’s renowned collections of photography and Chinese painting.

An education center on the ground floor will include five of the six object study classrooms for hands-on object-based teaching; a large room that can accommodate up to 250 people for conferences, shows and events; a conference room that can accommodate 60 people; two seminar rooms; and two “creativity laboratories” for artistic activities. A sixth object study classroom will be located in the full-service conservation studio located on the second and third floors.

In line with Princeton University’s Sustainability Action Plan, the new museum building will reduce greenhouse gas emissions through minimal south-facing glazing, exterior envelope, mechanical systems, lighting and orders, utility conversion from steam to hot water and carbon offsetting from heavy wood. Under these same policies, 85% or more of materials removed from the site are recycled or reused.


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Inside the ‘inevitable explosive plastic’ at the Aspen Art Museum https://911gallery.org/inside-the-inevitable-explosive-plastic-at-the-aspen-art-museum/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 15:49:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/inside-the-inevitable-explosive-plastic-at-the-aspen-art-museum/ Installation view: “Andy Warhol, Lifetimes”, Aspen Art Museum, 2021. (Carter Seddon / Courtesy photo) Installation view: “Andy Warhol, Lifetimes”, Aspen Art Museum, 2021. (Carter Seddon / Courtesy photo) Installation view: “Andy Warhol, Lifetimes”, Aspen Art Museum, 2021. (Carter Seddon / Courtesy photo) Installation view: “Andy Warhol, Lifetimes”, Aspen Art Museum, 2021. (Carter Seddon / Courtesy […]]]>

The Aspen Art Museum’s Andy Warhol Inquiry does just about everything an art exhibit can do to express Warhol’s creative vision – showing the most important work, contextualizing it with ephemeral and biographical exhibits, highlighting evidencing lesser-known or overlooked aspects of his practice and generally opening viewers to look to new ways of seeing the artist.

But one of the most important aspects of Warhol’s groundbreaking production is also his most fleeting – the multimedia events he designed and staged as “The Exploding Plastic Inevitable” in 1966 and 1967 with the Velvet. Underground and other artists.

Can it be recreated? The museum is trying.



His “Exploding Plastic Inevitable”, designed by the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, is a dark room lit by spinning disco balls and filled with projections and audio of the “Exploding Plastic Inevitable” performances in a room filled with inviting bean bags. viewers to soak up the experience. The multi-channel video is playing on all four walls – you’ll hear the Velvet Underground and Nico and see Edie Sedgwick, Gerard Malanga and Barbara Rubin.

But can it capture what the real experiences were, with their light shows, strobe lights, slides and movie projections and with the Velvets playing louder than loud interpretations of their stunning compositions? Maybe a few pieces, and probably not something like the real thing. Still, sitting there can spark the imagination, an effort worth it.



“These events represent Warhol’s epiphany moment and remain his greatest work,” former Warhol museum director and curator Mark Francis said of these “Exploding Plastic Inevitable” events, “as difficult as it is. or for us to feel their flavor today “.

It all started in April 1966 when Warhol rented a community center on St Mark’s Place in the devastated East Village of Manhattan and began to create a nightlife environment for artists and performers in his fertile pop art kingdom. The brief run that followed, there and on college campus tours, followed Warhol’s miraculous creative collision of meeting the Velvets in late 1965.

The collaboration has been recreated and reiterated in numerous books and films, including Todd Haynes’ incisive new documentary “The Velvet Underground,” which attempts to recreate the aesthetic of those early shows.

“As far as I can imagine… it was all happening because we were really interested in everything that was going on,” Warhol said of the must-see experiences at The Factory and on “Exploding Plastic Inevitable”. “The Pop idea, after all, was that anyone could do anything, so naturally we would all try to do anything.”

Of course, the cold space of a museum gallery will never replicate what it must have been during these quirky and wild events. If they did, it would actually be a lot more uncomfortable than what’s going on in the basement gallery of the Aspen Art Museum.

“It’s tricky,” Warhol biographer Black Gopnik said in a recent telephone interview. “I think my complaint about this is that they can never go up to 11 amps in a museum. One very important thing about the Velvet Underground is that they always set the amplifiers to 12. It was incredibly loud, with incredible amounts of feedback. It’s just very difficult to recreate that in the polished spaces of contemporary museums.



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Start of construction of a new house for the PU art museum https://911gallery.org/start-of-construction-of-a-new-house-for-the-pu-art-museum/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 01:31:25 +0000 https://911gallery.org/start-of-construction-of-a-new-house-for-the-pu-art-museum/ NEW HOUSE: Interior rendering of a pavilion gallery in the new Princeton University Art Museum designed by Adjaye Associates. Construction of the new building is expected to be completed in early 2024. (Courtesy of Ajaye Associates) Construction has started on the new Princeton University Art Museum, a brand new building on the site of the […]]]>

NEW HOUSE: Interior rendering of a pavilion gallery in the new Princeton University Art Museum designed by Adjaye Associates. Construction of the new building is expected to be completed in early 2024. (Courtesy of Ajaye Associates)

Construction has started on the new Princeton University Art Museum, a brand new building on the site of the old museum, in the heart of the Princeton campus. Roughly doubling the size of the existing facility, the 144,000 square foot facility significantly increases the exhibition, learning and facility space for visitors. The museum, which will occupy three floors, will fit into campus life with key footpaths circulating in and through the building via two ‘art walks’ – circulation routes that function as the circulatory backbone of the new building. A grid of nine pavilions breaks down the scale of the complex into more intimate modules and allows for deeply varied gallery experiences.

The exterior of the building will be characterized by rough and polished stone surfaces responding to the campus environment, as well as characteristic bronze details, alternating solid elements with more transparent ones that speak both of the present moment and of the historical context of Princeton. Architect Sir David Adjaye, whose firm Adjaye Associates is best known for his design for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, was selected as the project architect in 2018. Cooper Robertson is the executive architect.

With vast and growing collections of over 112,000 works of art spanning the globe from ancient times to the present day, the Princeton University Art Museum is a major center for the study of the humanities and the visual arts in the United States. United. The new building underscores Princeton’s commitment to humanistic education and the museum’s commitment to both object-based research and to marrying scientific excellence with accessibility. The new facility will also house the Princeton Department of Art and Archeology and the Marquand Library; together, the three units will continue to function as a premier site for research and teaching. The design overcomes multiple historical barriers to participation, making the visual arts an essential part of the college experience for all Princeton students and an accessible hotbed of democratic engagement for community members and visitors.

The contracts were awarded in June 2021 and over the summer demolition began on the old museum complex, most of which dated from construction periods of the 1920s, 1960s and 1980s.

“David Adjaye’s design for Princeton reflects our deep commitment to the values ​​of openness, transparency and interconnection for our campus members, local communities and the global public,” said James Steward, Nancy A. Nasher -David J. Haemisegger, class of 1976, principal. “This is a remarkable opportunity both to build on the past and to shape a new museum at this particular historic moment, and in doing so, to clearly show the important role museums can continue to play in a world. more and more complex. ”

With demolition due to be completed this month, with concrete foundations to be poured starting this month, and construction continuing through early 2024, the museum has put in place a number of strategies to maintain its scientific and public impact during years of disruption. She operates two galleries in downtown Princeton, within walking distance of campus: Art @ Bainbridge and Art on Hulfish. Two outdoor exhibitions are also planned, starting with the video work of artist Doug Aitken. Additionally, the museum will visit four exhibits at museums in the United States and Mexico during construction.

For more information, visit artmuseum.princeton.edu.


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