Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 21:00:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://911gallery.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-28T144735.431-150x150.png Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ 32 32 Denver Art Museum’s ‘Her Brush’ Highlights Japan’s Early Female Artists https://911gallery.org/denver-art-museums-her-brush-highlights-japans-early-female-artists/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 21:00:36 +0000 https://911gallery.org/denver-art-museums-her-brush-highlights-japans-early-female-artists/ “The Nun Ryonen (Ryonen-ni)” from Famous Women of Past and Present (Kokon meifuden) (1864), Utagawa Kunisada and Ryūtei Tanehiko (Courtesy of Denver Art Museum) “Why were there no great female artists?” wrote Linda Nochlin in her influential 1971 essay on feminist art history. Throughout history across the world, women have faced cultural, social and institutional […]]]>

“The Nun Ryonen (Ryonen-ni)” from Famous Women of Past and Present (Kokon meifuden) (1864), Utagawa Kunisada and Ryūtei Tanehiko (Courtesy of Denver Art Museum)

“Why were there no great female artists?” wrote Linda Nochlin in her influential 1971 essay on feminist art history.

Throughout history across the world, women have faced cultural, social and institutional barriers to becoming great artists in patriarchal societies. Despite their talent, they have been systematically underrepresented and excluded from the male-dominated canon of art history.

This is especially true in pre-modern Japan, during the Edo period (1603-1867), where women occupied a subordinate role dictated by Confucianism’s “Three Denominations” – the principle that women should obey their father, husband and son. However, despite these strict gender roles and societal restrictions, some notable women have overcome these barriers to leave their mark on Japanese art history.

Their legacy lives on in the Denver Art Museum‘s latest exhibit, “Her Brush: Japanese Women Artists from the Fong-Johnstone Collection,” which opened November 13.

The exhibition consists of 100 works of painting, calligraphy and ceramics by approximately 30 artists from the 1600s to the 1900s, including Kiyohara Yukinobu 清原雪信 (1643–1682), Ōtagaki Rengetsu 太田垣蓮月 (1791–1875) and Okuhara Seiko 奥原晴湖 (1837-1913).

“Breaking Waves in the Pines (Shōtō)” (late 1900s), Murase Myōdō (Courtesy Denver Art Museum)

“It’s an exploration of how art can be a vehicle for empowerment, a form of taking a place as a woman in a patriarchy, and how these artists, through their art, have inscribed themselves into our present,” said Dr. Einor Cervone, associate curator of Asian art at DAM and co-curator of “Her Brush.”

“Her Brush” is the largest exhibition in the United States of premodern Japanese women artists in more than three decades – since Patricia Fister’s “Japanese Women Artists 1600-1900” exhibition at the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas in 1988.

Many of the works by “Her Brush”, donated from the private collections of Dr. John Fong and Dr. Colin Johnstone in 2018, will go on public display for the first time in centuries.

Many of these premodern female artists received little or no recognition, even in Japan. This is the result of a variety of historical and contemporary factors, including the lack of archival records of their life and legacy and the anti-feminist bias present in many art institutions in Japan.

After a feminist wave rocked the Japanese art world in the 1990s, a widespread conservative backlash began in the early 2000s, making it increasingly difficult to use the words “feminism” and “gender” , according to Stephanie Su, assistant professor of Asian art history. at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Su’s research includes global modernism, historiography, and the history of collecting and exhibiting in modern Japan and China.

On Nov. 3, Su appeared alongside Cervone and Patricia Graham, a research associate at the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Kansas, for a panel on DAM’s “Her Brush” and the role of female artists in the art world of the 17th century. in modern times. The panel, titled “Outstanding Japanese Women Artists and Craftswomen in a Male-Dominated World,” was organized by CU Boulder’s Center for Asian Studies and the Department of History.

“A lot of institutions don’t like the term feminism,” Su said. “They think adding a gender perspective imposes Western ideas on Japanese culture. Second, many [contemporary art critics] I think there are no great female artists [from the past]. They believe it to be a historical truth. As a result, many academics feel their work is not valued.

“Autumn Landscape” (late 1700s), Kō (Ōshima) Raikin (Courtesy of Denver Art Museum)

Despite this prejudiced perspective in many traditional Japanese institutions, art historians and curators in America and other countries around the world have worked to challenge the gender status quo in Japanese art history. .

“Her Brush” marks a milestone for this movement. The exhibition, divided into seven thematic sections, contextualizes the work of women artists according to their identity and social class, rather than by theme or era. The first section, “The Inner Rooms” (ōoku 大奥), illustrates how upper-class women born into elite and wealthy households were trained in the “three perfections” (poetry, painting, and calligraphy) to entertain at court and be a suitable companion. for their future husbands. Although most were amateur artists, a few exceptionally talented and resourceful aristocratic women became professionals.

Another section, “Taking Tonsure” (shukke 出家), presents the work of Buddhist nuns. In the Edo period, although they had even fewer rights than monks, nuns enjoyed greater social status and autonomy than lay people. This allowed them to freely pursue their passion for art. The other sections intertwine various identities, including women born into the craft as “Workshop Girls”, intellectuals from “Literary Circles” (bunjinga 文人画) and musical performers (geisha 芸者), actors and sex workers in “Floating Worlds” (ukiyo 浮世), state-sanctioned entertainment districts.

“Flowering Plants of the Four Seasons” (1898), Okuhara Seiko (Courtesy of Denver Art Museum)

Despite the diversity of experiences of these women, their perseverance and ingenuity are a common thread across social classes and eras.

“A lot of artists [in this exhibit] show what it means to live a life without barriers,” Su said. “Their stories can be very inspiring to everyone, especially those who have faced many challenges in life.”

The Buddhist nun Rengetsu, widely regarded as one of the greatest Japanese poets of the 19th century, faced many hardships throughout her life. At the age of 13, she lost her adoptive brother and her mother. Over the next 30 years, most of her close family members died, including her four children, two husbands, and two adopted siblings. When her adoptive father died, she left his temple and began selling pottery decorated with his poetry to support herself. His masterful work was soon in great demand. DDuring his lifetime, it was said that every household in Kyoto apparently had at least one of his pottery works.

The “Take the Tonsure” section reflects the importance of Rengetsu’s legacy. The centerpiece of this section, Rengetsu’s “Journal of Travel to Arashiyama (Arashiyama hana no ki)” from the 1800s, features loosely brushed poetry, interspersed with minimalist illustrations. This diary offers an intimate insight into his personal life. Nearby, an imaginary portrait of “Rengetsu working in his hut” appears, painted 60 years after the artist’s death by Suganuma Ōhō 菅沼大鳳 (1891-1966) as a tribute to his legacy.

“Willow and Frog” (mid-1900s), Ōishi Junkyō (courtesy Denver Art Museum)

This section also features the works of Ōishi Junkyō 大石順教 (1888-1968), known as the Mother of the Handicapped, who established herself as a gifted missionary, social worker and artist. Junkyō was recognized for her mouth-drawn paintings, a style she adopted to adapt to having both arms amputated – the tragic result of an attack by her adoptive father when she was a teenager.

In “Her Brush”, Junkyō’s work “Willow and Frog” from the mid-1900s depicts the uplifting story of courtier Ono no Tōfū 小野道風 (894-964). After failing to get a promotion seven times, Tōfū wanted to quit – until he found inspiration in a determined frog, who was trying to jump on a willow branch. The frog failed seven times, before finally succeeding on his eighth attempt, inspiring the courtier to persevere and eventually become a successful statesman.

The final section of the exhibit, “Unstoppable (No Barriers),” features another Buddhist nun with an inspiring story: Murase Myōdō 村瀬明道尼 (1924-2013). Myōdō, who lost her arm and the use of her right leg in a traffic accident in her late thirties, refused to let physical limitations hold her back from her creative endeavors. During her recovery, she learned to use her left hand to create masterful calligraphy. His work “Mu (No or Nothing)” and “Kan (Barrier)” (無関), featuring the two figures painted on opposite sides of the table screen, offers a visual representation of the expansion beyond beyond physical limits.

“Mu (no or nothing) and Kan (barrier)”, Murase Myōdō (Courtesy of Denver Art Museum)

“Mu (no or nothing) and Kan (barrier)”, Murase Myōdō (Courtesy of Denver Art Museum)

The inspiring stories of these three women and others can be found on collectible tanzaku (colorful poetry sheets), designed by Denver-based artist Sarah Fukami, in several locations throughout the exhibit. Traditionally, tanzaku, written by men and women of many social classes, were given as gifts – or hung on bamboo branches during festivals to make wishes come true. Fukami’s modernized tanzaku, intended to appeal to younger audiences, are formatted as a trading card with the artist’s portrait and a short biography in English and Spanish.

“We hope that this exhibition can be aimed at people of all ages,” said Karuna Srikureja, Associate Interpretation Specialist for DAM’s Asian Art Department. “Maybe we can trigger [interest] in young girls. They can become big fans of Japanese artists and grow up with these personalities in mind.

Poem Slips (tanzaku) (1700s-1900s) (Courtesy of Denver Art Museum)

Another interactive element of the exhibition includes a large projection screen on the final wall, inviting visitors to create their own ephemeral calligraphy.

“We try to convey the notion of the brush as an extension of the body,” Cervone said. “We want to help visitors embody and experience physically and viscerally the idea of ​​leaving a mark through art.”

Through this, Cervone hopes visitors will be able to connect with the power of the brush as a force for self-expression and agency – just as these Japanese women did centuries ago.

“It’s a way to register in our presence,” Cervone said. “It’s a remarkable and bold act to take your place as a woman. This notion of leaving a brushstroke is a way of deciding that your artistic voice is important enough to be heard.

“Her Brush: Japanese Women Artists the Fong-Johnstone Collection” will be on view from November 13 to May 13, 2023 in the Bonfils-Stanton Gallery on Level 1 of the Martin Building at the Denver Art Museum. The exhibit is included in general admission.

Contact CU Freelance Editor Izzy Fincher at isabella.fincher@colorado.edu.

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Delaware Art Museum launches new outdoor art curation program https://911gallery.org/delaware-art-museum-launches-new-outdoor-art-curation-program/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 23:09:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/delaware-art-museum-launches-new-outdoor-art-curation-program/ Wilmington will soon have new conservators to help restore the city’s public art. The Delaware Art Museum is launching a new public art curator training program next spring. Six to eight people will be trained with a professional art conservator to care for approximately 30 pieces of outdoor public art. Benét Curatorial Project Manager (ben-AYE) […]]]>

Wilmington will soon have new conservators to help restore the city’s public art.

The Delaware Art Museum is launching a new public art curator training program next spring.

Six to eight people will be trained with a professional art conservator to care for approximately 30 pieces of outdoor public art.

Benét Curatorial Project Manager (ben-AYE) Burton said the six-month program is designed to work with people from diverse backgrounds to revitalize Wilmington’s public works of art.

“Conservation is a very intensive skill to learn. So we wanted to give them enough time to lay the groundwork for the hands-on, on-site training they’ll get, but also to develop those skills throughout the program,” Burton said.

She adds that the Museum will prioritize hiring people of color, those on the behavioral health spectrum and those facing economic hardship.

Burton hopes to see the program expand statewide.

“There is so much public art in Wilmington alone, but also in all three counties of Delaware. We hope that with this pilot project, we will lead by example and we can get more funding so that we can have more public art curators outside of Wilmington to maintain our state’s beautiful outdoor galleries,” a- she declared.

The program will launch in the spring in partnership with the Creative Vision Factory in Wilmington.

It is funded by the American Rescue Plan Act.

Artistic coverage by Delaware Public Media is made possible, in part, through support from the Delaware Arts Divisiona state agency dedicated to promoting and supporting the arts in Delaware, in partnership with the National Foundation for the Arts.

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Denver Art Museum Celebrates Efforts to Bring Inclusiveness and Spanish to Exhibits https://911gallery.org/denver-art-museum-celebrates-efforts-to-bring-inclusiveness-and-spanish-to-exhibits/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 17:03:32 +0000 https://911gallery.org/denver-art-museum-celebrates-efforts-to-bring-inclusiveness-and-spanish-to-exhibits/ Editor’s Note: Press releases are provided to Yellow Scene. In an effort to keep our community informed, we issue a few press releases in full. By Christy SteadmanColorado Community Media (via AP Storyshare) Clara Ricciardi, manager of Spanish language liaison and community engagement at the Denver Art Museum, will be honored at the museum’s 40th […]]]>

Editor’s Note: Press releases are provided to Yellow Scene. In an effort to keep our community informed, we issue a few press releases in full.

By Christy Steadman
Colorado Community Media (via AP Storyshare)

Clara Ricciardi, manager of Spanish language liaison and community engagement at the Denver Art Museum, will be honored at the museum’s 40th Collectors’ Choice fundraising gala for her efforts that have made the museum more diverse and inclusive. Courtesy of Colorado Community Media

DENVER — Walking through the Denver Art Museum with Clara Ricciardi is like traveling back in time to Mesoamerica and experiencing it firsthand.

She’ll tell the story behind a ttippin that the Incas used to pin clothes, or point out an intricate detail – and why it’s there – in a painting from the Spanish colonial era.

The museum’s collections of Ancient Americas and Latin American art are there to “allow (people) to learn more,” Ricciardi said.

Ricciardi is DAM’s Senior Spanish Language and Community Engagement Liaison. She is a key person behind the gallery‘s bilingual labels and museum orientation, bringing greater appreciation for diversity to Colorado.

She has worked towards this goal with the museum for three decades. On November 18, the museum will honor Ricciardi’s efforts at its 40th annual Collectors’ Choice fundraising gala. Collectors Craig Ponzio and John and Sandy Fox will also receive accolades for their visionary contributions to the museum.

Ricciardi, who has a background in law school, is originally from Mexico City and at age 21 came to California to work for the Mexican Consulate General. There, she met Geno Ricciardi, whose family has a centuries-old connection to Colorado. On their first date, Geno brought Clara to Colorado and, more specifically, DAM.

She not only fell in love with Geno, she fell in love with the museum, where she was happy to see her heritage represented.

“It was a treat to see the objects (that are) part of my culture,” she said.

The Ricciardis moved to Denver in 1988. Clara began to feel homesick for her Mexico City, a place she describes as an open-air museum where “you’re surrounded by art.”

So in 1992, when a friend told her about a volunteer opportunity with an upcoming traveling exhibit at DAM called “Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation,” she jumped on it.

And so, Ricciardi found his place to connect with community and art.

“It was really exciting to have visitors who didn’t know the museum, but who knew the objects (exhibited),” Ricciardi said.

One such item is a metate, which roughly translates to a grinder. It dates back thousands of years to Mesoamerica, but is still found in some homes today. Seeing a metate in the museum, people sometimes said they remembered it from their grandmother, Ricciardi said.

“They see themselves here, like me,” Ricciardi said. “They see their culture reflected in a place that represents art.”

Ricciardi eventually became DAM’s first Spanish language program coordinator.

When Ricciardi started, the museum did not offer bilingual tours. She therefore led efforts to move them forward. She has also forged relationships with school districts in the metropolitan area to engage children of all grades and their families.

“Clara knows the power of language to connect,” said Heather Nielsen, learning and engagement manager at DAM. “She brings an infectious energy and a caring hand to every interaction she has. Clara never tires of making DAM feel like home to so many visitors, welcoming them warmly through the doors in Spanish and always with the most beautiful of smiles.

Another highlight of Ricciardi’s tenure is the annual Día del Niño. He celebrated his 20th birthday this year. Día del Niño, which translates to Children’s Day, is a Mexican tradition that was brought to the United States.

Ricciardi “planned every detail of the incredible Día del Niño event as carefully as she oversaw the implementation of the Spanish language in our Old and Latin American art galleries, and in all of our special exhibitions and galleries” , said Christoph Heinrich, director of the Frederick and Jan Mayer galleries at DAM. “Without his gentle but tenacious push, the DAM would not be what it is today.”

All of these efforts are shining examples of Ricciardi’s pride in DAM.

“The museum is a little treasure in the city,” Ricciardi said. “It’s a way to connect with the rest of the world and the art inside isn’t just three-dimensional. It’s alive.”

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Residents will have a say in the future of the Bury Art Museum https://911gallery.org/residents-will-have-a-say-in-the-future-of-the-bury-art-museum/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/residents-will-have-a-say-in-the-future-of-the-bury-art-museum/ Residents are being asked to give their views on the future use of the Bury Art Museum as the council looks to find ways to significantly reduce costs. An assessment of the historic building and service options is underway as part of the council’s plans to cut £29m from its budget. In a report, discussing […]]]>

Residents are being asked to give their views on the future use of the Bury Art Museum as the council looks to find ways to significantly reduce costs.

An assessment of the historic building and service options is underway as part of the council’s plans to cut £29m from its budget.

In a report, discussing its medium-term financial strategy, the council says it could cut the gallery’s budget for the year 2024/2025 by £250,000.

The assessment also includes a suggestion to cut the equivalent of eight full-time staff over the same period.

But the report says the gallery will be included in Bury City Council’s masterplan as a ‘Creatives’ space.

The Moss Street Building includes the Art Gallery Museum and the Sculpture Center.

The Art Gallery was purpose-built to house the Wrigley Collection, donated to the borough in 1897 and opened in 1901.

It has since incorporated many works of contemporary art, and part of the building was recently converted to become a sculpture center to display works in this medium.

However, major repairs are needed, particularly to the roof of the building at a cost of £1million.

A consultation with a conservation architect has begun and a grant application for these repairs is in progress.

Cllr Charlotte Morris, Cabinet Member for Culture and the Economy for the Council, said: ‘The Bury Art Museum, which is at the heart of the city centre’s cultural quarter, is a vital part of our borough’s heritage. and we want to build on the past century of history with a bright future for the building and the collections it houses.

“However, we are facing a harsh financial reality and this year alone we have to cut the council’s budget by £29million.

This is largely due to soaring inflation and fuel bills, as well as growing demand for services for the most vulnerable, but we have already seen a decade of austerity.

“Over the past 12 years the government has cut over £100million from our funding which means we now have to look at every service we provide in order to balance the budget.

“So we’re considering creative uses for the building to understand how we can reduce costs and/or increase revenue, while helping our borough’s creative talent thrive.”

“An options assessment is underway to explore how we could achieve £250,000 in savings and will consider measures such as greater marketing, an extended digital offering, the provision of partnerships and the repurposing of museum space .”

Cllr Morris added: ‘We have launched a public consultation with local residents and businesses as we want to hear their views before setting next year’s budget.

“I urge anyone interested in culture and the arts in Bury to get involved in this consultation – go to www.onecommunitybury.co.uk/bury-art-museum and have your say.”

The gallery is also hosting a day of events for families on Saturday, November 26 to encourage people to get involved in the consultation.

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The Phoenix Art Museum Announces Free Admission Program for All MCCCD Students https://911gallery.org/the-phoenix-art-museum-announces-free-admission-program-for-all-mcccd-students/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/the-phoenix-art-museum-announces-free-admission-program-for-all-mcccd-students/ “At the core of our mission, our mission is to support the community we serve through the work of the Phoenix Art Museum,” said Joel Coen, President of the Men’s Arts Council. “This program will allow families and students to rediscover the museum and hopefully be part of the resurgence of the Phoenix art scene.” […]]]>

“At the core of our mission, our mission is to support the community we serve through the work of the Phoenix Art Museum,” said Joel Coen, President of the Men’s Arts Council. “This program will allow families and students to rediscover the museum and hopefully be part of the resurgence of the Phoenix art scene.”

The Phoenix Art Museum is now offering free admission daily to all Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) students with an active student ID. Made possible through the generosity of the Men’s Arts Council (MAC), a nonprofit member organization dedicated to supporting the museum’s community outreach programs, the free access program, colloquially known as MC3@PAM, offers an affordable way for the Valley community – college students will be able to experience the museum’s program of exhibitions on American, Western, Asian, European, Latin American, Modern and Contemporary art and fashion design.

“The Phoenix Art Museum is delighted to announce this access program in partnership with the Men’s Arts Council,” said Jeremy Mikolajczak, Museum Director and CEO Sybil Harrington. “Free admission programs like MC3@PAM break down economic barriers and reinforce our commitment to opening doors and expanding access to the arts for our audience in Arizona. Many community college students are among the first in their families to have the opportunity to go to college, and with over 75% of MCCCD students attending part-time, balancing work and family with their studies, we didn’t want anything to stop these students from appreciate arts and culture.We are deeply grateful to the MAC for its exceptional generosity, for meeting this need in our community, and for helping to create new generations of Museum visitors for years to come.

Through MC3@PAM, all Maricopa Community Colleges students who attend one of 10 affiliated colleges or skill centers will enjoy free general admission to the Phoenix Art Museum, including admission to special exhibits. The program, which has been funded until 2025, also creates opportunities to integrate the visual arts into university curricula. Support for the program comes from a transformative $1 million grant the museum received from the Men’s Arts Council in September 2022. In addition to MC3@PAM, the major gift will support quarterly Family Days, with free general admission, art-making workshops, guided tours and other exciting events like the new position of Associate Curator of Museum Education, a responsible role in developing enriching arts education programs for the public; PhxArt Amplified, the museum’s popular weekend music and arts experience, featuring musicians performing in the museum’s galleries and public gathering spaces; and key technology upgrades.

“At the core of our mission, our mission is to support the community we serve through the work of the Phoenix Art Museum,” said Joel Coen, President of the Men’s Arts Council. “This program will allow families and students to rediscover the museum and hopefully be part of the resurgence of the Phoenix art scene.”

Maricopa Community Colleges, one of the largest community college districts in the nation, enrolls more than 100,000 students annually and provides an affordable, high-quality education to students seeking degrees and skills in nearly any area of ​​life. Greater Phoenix metropolitan area. Students enrolled for any number of credits and with active ID from Chandler-Gilbert, Estrella Mountain, GateWay, Glendale, Mesa, Paradise Valley, Phoenix, Rio Salado, Scottsdale, and South Mountain Community Colleges are eligible for the free admission program.

“We would like to thank the Men’s Arts Council and the Phoenix Art Museum for their generous donation providing access to the Maricopa community college population of approximately 100,000 students,” said Chancellor Steven Gonzales. “Partnerships like these create even more value, cultural experiences and learning opportunities for our students.”

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The Skanner News – Seattle Art Museum features groundbreaking photographs by Dawoud and Carrie Mae Weems https://911gallery.org/the-skanner-news-seattle-art-museum-features-groundbreaking-photographs-by-dawoud-and-carrie-mae-weems/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 17:49:02 +0000 https://911gallery.org/the-skanner-news-seattle-art-museum-features-groundbreaking-photographs-by-dawoud-and-carrie-mae-weems/ SEATTLE – The Seattle Art Museum (SAM) presents Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue (November 17, 2022 through January 22, 2023), showcasing over 140 works by two of photography’s most important artists working today. Both born in 1953, Bey and Weems explore ideas grounded in refracted black experiences through issues of gender, class […]]]>

SEATTLE – The Seattle Art Museum (SAM) presents Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue (November 17, 2022 through January 22, 2023), showcasing over 140 works by two of photography’s most important artists working today. Both born in 1953, Bey and Weems explore ideas grounded in refracted black experiences through issues of gender, class and systems of power. In Dialogue presents a series of thematic explorations of their distinct but overlapping concerns and approaches. This is the first time their celebrated work – the subject of numerous solo and group exhibitions – has been shown together to explore their fiery engagement with each other over the years.

The Seattle Art Museum is the third leg of the exhibition’s US tour, hosted by the Grand Rapids Art Museum and curated by Ron Platt. The Seattle iteration is curated by Catharina Manchanda, Jon and Mary Shirley Curators of Modern and Contemporary Art. “The work of these two artists has never been more relevant, combining a tender embrace and celebration of black people with a lucid awareness of the power imbalances they have been subjected to since the days of slavery,” says Manchanda. “We are thrilled to invite everyone into their conversations about art, culture and history throughout their careers.”

Alongside the exhibition, the museum will showcase dynamic programs and engagement opportunities. A free community opening will take place on December 1 during the first Thursday when the museum is free for all, all day. And the #SAMPhotoClub social media initiative invites people to share photographs based on themes inspired by the exhibition for the opportunity to be featured on SAM digital channels.

Explore the exhibition

Bey and Weems first met in 1976, when they were both 23. Bey was teaching a photography class at the Studio Museum in Harlem and Weems was a student. The two bonded and in the decades that followed continued to connect over common artistic concerns, including their larger goal of using photography to create authentic images of Black Americans that would deepen understanding within the broader culture of the complexity and beauty of black lives and experiences. .

The artistic careers of Bey and Weems overlap in many ways. They are joined by their passion for a complex understanding of the history of black life within the hierarchies of existing power structures. They both create visually and technically stunning photographs using different camera formats and processes. Finally, the two artists work in thematic series which, seen together, have a particular weight.

In addition to photography, the exhibition includes a video work by each artist. In Dialogue also features a visual timeline of their lives, careers and historical events, to offer visitors the opportunity to delve deeper into the references explored in their work. -30-

First works

The first section presents scenes of urban life and domestic scenes with passers-by or family as subjects. Bey’s penetrating portraits show a tenderness and close rapport with his subjects; this section also includes Self and Shadow (1980), an evocative image of his shadow cast in the street. Weems’ works reflect a poignant understanding of the body’s power to communicate psychological depth when staged in space. This section presents Weems’s first self-portrait (1975), in which the artist stands with his back to the camera in a domestic space, appearing to be standing comfortably. Also featured in this section are intimate family scenes and portraits of people he met during his travels.

Expand reach

This section traces the evolution of the artists in the late 1980s and 1990s. Bey deepens his engagement with his subjects, especially teenagers, working with them to create evocative portraits that reflect mutual trust. This period also saw Weems’ increasing use of narrative frameworks, including her groundbreaking series The Kitchen Table (1990), a fictional photographic essay featuring the artist among subjects exploring women’s self-perception.

Resurrecting Black Stories

This section explores the artists’ mutual interest in black history in America. Bey’s Night Coming Tenderly, Black series (2017) documents sites believed to be on the Underground Railroad, a network helping slaves to freedom in the 19th century. These large-scale works show Bey working in a more abstract and poetic mode, placing the viewer viscerally in the perspective of someone navigating the landscape. Shades of velvety black and gray create a subtle interplay of light and dark inspired by 20th century photographers including Roy DeCarava. Meanwhile, Weems’ Sea Islands series (1991-92) features island locations off the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina that are home to Gullah communities and culture, including ruins, markers and artifacts, reflecting his interest in the importance of the oral. stories and mythologies. In Weems’ From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried series (1995-96), the artist enlarged and edited images from 1850 in which enslaved Africans were presented as anthropological subjects rather than humans; Weems questions the racist history and purpose of these images. Memorial and Requiem

Also on display are works that express the importance of commemoration in black culture. Bey’s Birmingham Project (2019) features portraits of present-day Birmingham-area children and teenagers who are the same age as six black youths killed in the Alabama city in 1963, including the four girls killed in the bombing of the Baptist Church on 16th Street; these are placed in diptychs with adults from the Birmingham area who are of the potential age of today’s youth. Weems’ Constructing History series (2008) focuses on well-known images of 20th century tragedies such as the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and John F. Kennedy, reenacting them with students and community members in ‘Atlanta.

Revelations in the landscape

In Dialogue also looks at the impact of place on our lives. Bey revisited the site of his early work with Harlem Redux (2014-16), moving away from close-up portraits to focus on the relentless gentrification of the urban landscape and the disappearance of black culture, photographed in color. In Weems’ surprisingly restrained and formally constructed series Roaming (2006), she stages her own body in architectural spaces across Rome, Italy – a reminder of the history of power, conquest and domination of the city, from ancient and imperial Rome to the fascist government of Mussolini in the early 20th century.

Reclining Girl, Fiji, 1982–83, Carrie Mae Weems, American, born 1953, gelatin silver print, 5 5/16 x 8 15/16 inches, © Carrie Mae Weems, courtesy of the artist and the Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Schedules & tickets

  • Museum opening hours
  • Closed Monday & Tuesday
  • Wednesday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Holiday schedules on the site

Ticket prices

  • Adult: $29.99 in advance / $32.99 the day of
  • Senior (65+), Military (with ID): $27.99 in advance / $30.99 on day of
  • Student (with ID), Teen (15-18): $19.99 upfront / $22.99 on day of
  • Children (14 and under): FREE
  • SAM Members: FREE

Special prices

  • First Thursdays: Free for all
  • First Fridays: Free general admission for seniors (65+)

Details are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information on planning a visit, visit seattleartmuseum.org.

Exhibition catalog

A 176-page illustrated catalog with 200 color and black-and-white illustrations published with DelMonico Books and distributed by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. will be available for purchase from SAM Shop ($50). Also titled Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue (ISBN: 978-1636810454), the catalog includes scholarly essays by Grand Rapids Art Museum Chief Curator Ron Platt and Deputy Director of the National Museum of History and Culture Afro-American Kinshasa Holman Conwill, as well as reflections from the two artists.

ORGANIZATION AND SUPPORT FOR THE EXHIBITION

Dawoud Bey & Carrie Mae Weems: In Dialogue is organized by the Grand Rapids Art Museum, with the generous support of MillerKnoll. Additional support is provided by the Wege Foundation, Agnes Gund, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Eenhoorn, LLC.

Main sponsors

Delta
4Culture
Supporting Sponsor Perkins Coie LLP

About the Seattle Museum of Art

As the Pacific Northwest’s leading visual arts institution, SAM leverages its global collections, powerful exhibitions, and vibrant programs to provide unique educational resources to benefit the Seattle area, Northwest of the Pacific and beyond. SAM was founded in 1933 with a focus on Asian art. By the late 1980s, the museum had outgrown its original home, and in 1991 a new 155,000 square foot downtown building, designed by Venturi, Scott Brown & Associates, opened. to the public. The 1933 building was renovated and rededicated as an Asian Art Museum in 1994, and it reopened on February 8, 2020, after extensive renovation and expansion. SAM’s desire to further serve its community came to fruition in 2007 with the opening of two stunning new facilities: the nine-acre Olympic Sculpture Park (designed by Weiss/Manfredi Architects) – a “museum without walls”, free and open to all – and Allied Works architecture has designed a 118,000 square foot extension to its main downtown location, including 232,000 square feet of additional constructed space for future expansion. The Olympic Sculpture Park and downtown SAM expansion celebrated their tenth anniversary in 2017.

From a strong base of Asian art to notable collections of African and Oceanic art, Northwest Coast Native American art, European and American art, and modern and contemporary art, the strength of the collection of approximately 25,000 SAM objects lies in its diversity of media, cultures, and time periods.

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Open-air Crosing exhibition opens at the Bury Art Museum https://911gallery.org/open-air-crosing-exhibition-opens-at-the-bury-art-museum/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 11:10:04 +0000 https://911gallery.org/open-air-crosing-exhibition-opens-at-the-bury-art-museum/ Bury Art Museum offers visitors a unique chance to view a body of work by sculptor/artist David Gilbert. “Crossing Open Ground” opens Nov. 5 and features the work of an artist who rarely exhibited after the 1960s, being reluctant to engage in the commercial art world. The exhibition features wooden sculptures, as well as drawings, […]]]>

Bury Art Museum offers visitors a unique chance to view a body of work by sculptor/artist David Gilbert.

“Crossing Open Ground” opens Nov. 5 and features the work of an artist who rarely exhibited after the 1960s, being reluctant to engage in the commercial art world.

The exhibition features wooden sculptures, as well as drawings, prints and woodcuts, many of which relate to the sculptures.

During the last 20 years of his life he exhibited at the Peter Scott Gallery at Lancaster University, the Manx Art Gallery and Museum and in Liverpool during the Culture Year. At these exhibitions, her work was seen by the director of Tate Liverpool and the director of the North West Arts Council, Aileen McEvoy. They both commented that it was a very important work in the history of British sculpture, and his last work “What is the Case?”, Although made up of over 100 small sculptures, they have monumental significance.

Gilbert was born in Uxbridge in 1928 and died in North Wales in 2016. After reading English at Cambridge, he lived briefly in Cornwall, London and Sweden. He then lived with his family in Arran, the Cotswolds, Isle of Man, Lancaster, then towards the end of his life he moved to North West Wales on the Llyn Peninsula, working until at the end of his life.

JThe exhibition runs until February 18, 2023. The Bury Art Museum is open 10am-5pm (Tuesday-Friday) and 10am-4.30pm on Saturdays.

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Orlando Skyline Attractions Help Launch Roller Coaster Inside Art Museum https://911gallery.org/orlando-skyline-attractions-help-launch-roller-coaster-inside-art-museum/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 16:02:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/orlando-skyline-attractions-help-launch-roller-coaster-inside-art-museum/ A one-person roller coaster mingles with museum patrons thanks to Orlando-based Skyline Attractions, which designed the ride that runs through an EJ Hill art exhibit. “As far as we know, this is the first functional, rideable roller coaster in a museum,” said Chris Gray, Vice President of Skyline. The ride has been installed at the […]]]>

A one-person roller coaster mingles with museum patrons thanks to Orlando-based Skyline Attractions, which designed the ride that runs through an EJ Hill art exhibit.

“As far as we know, this is the first functional, rideable roller coaster in a museum,” said Chris Gray, Vice President of Skyline.

The ride has been installed at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art — MASS MoCA, for short — and will operate during Hill’s “Brake Run Helix,” which debuts at the museum in North Adams, Massachusetts, this weekend.

The artist “has been fascinated by roller coasters all his life,” says Gray. Hill’s sculptures, paintings and photographs share space with the carousel.

The sculptures “sort of play on the form and function of roller coasters and amusement parks,” says curator Alexandra Foradas. “So they kind of work in the material vocabulary of the backyard roller coaster, using things that you might find either in the extra wood bin, or in your backyard, or at your local hardware store. “

The ride and its sole passenger take off from the mezzanine floor of the museum’s largest gallery, emerging from behind a two-tier stage curtain and descending to ground-level maneuvers.

“Once you push the coaster in, it’s like any other coaster; it works by gravity. And basically the wheel system is like any other conventional roller coaster wheel system, you know, it spins and moves,” says Gray. “It’s basically meant to look like a backyard roller coaster, although it’s high tech roller coaster stuff.”

The passenger leaves the carousel on a stage on the floor of the gallery.

“For the people who participate, it’s like they’re center stage. They are artists who play in collaboration with the roller coaster, which EJ considers an artist in itself,” says Foradas. “The roller coasters themselves are called ‘Brava!’ — an allusion to what one might shout at a female performer, in particular, after a big performance.

Museum visitors are isolated from the track when it runs once an hour, reservation required.

“As a roller coaster it’s quite small, but as an art installation it’s very high drama,” says Foradas.

Hill’s experience also includes stints as an endurance-based performance artist, Foradas says.

“He’s been doing installations and art and performance, a kind of meditation on a roller coaster, for a long time,” she says.

In Venice, he built a wooden roller coaster track.

“He would spend days walking on this track during the exhibit, with his body as it were instead of a roller coaster cart,” Foradas explains.

He also had a spectacular driving element request at the MASS MoCA: the rails of the new coaster are hot pink.

“The artist wants to paint the world pink,” says Gray. “So it’s been one of his primary colors in all of his paintings and structures and has been for years.”

For Hill, pink is a color associated with flowers and femininity, says Foradas.

“Next to the roller coaster, we have an installation of new paintings created by EJ as well as sculptures,” she says. “These paintings all have a pink background or pink background. And on top of that there’s kind of the geometries of roller coaster tracks and scaffolding and pink flowers, mostly roses.

The track pieces were built at Cornerstone Manufacturing in DeBary, then shipped — not yet pink — to Great Coasters International, a manufacturer in Pennsylvania, where they were riveted together. Then came the installment at the museum, located in the northeast corner of Massachusetts.

“Brake Run Helix” is scheduled to be at MASS MoCA for 18 months. While displaying Hill’s artistic skills, it may also be a commercial showcase for Skyline. The company has developed a seamless rail, which is used in the museum piece.

“It was something we had been thinking about for a very long time – how to create a track that we don’t need to have solders on,” Gray says. “Ultimately, the idea came down to that if we bend our tabs right and design it in a very unique way, we could probably rivet everything together.”

Benefits include faster installation and inspection times, reduced labor costs, and smoother rides. Great Coasters first used it on White Lightning, a coaster at the Fun Spot location near International Drive. The company has since tried it on a curve on the Predator ride at Six Flags Darien Lake in New York and on a drop on a rollercoaster at Michigan’s Adventure in Muskegon.

“It has the potential to really revolutionize the way the entertainment industry builds roller coaster tracks,” says Gray.

dbevil@orlandosentinel.com

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Are the protests at the Just Stop Oil art museum harming their own cause? https://911gallery.org/are-the-protests-at-the-just-stop-oil-art-museum-harming-their-own-cause/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 09:41:27 +0000 https://911gallery.org/are-the-protests-at-the-just-stop-oil-art-museum-harming-their-own-cause/ In partnership with Written by Colin Davis The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the authors. CNN features the work of The Conversation, a collaboration between journalists and scholars to provide analysis and commentary on the news. Content is produced solely by The Conversation. Members of the protest group Just Stop Oil […]]]>

In partnership with

Written by Colin Davis

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the authors. CNN features the work of The Conversation, a collaboration between journalists and scholars to provide analysis and commentary on the news. Content is produced solely by The Conversation.

Members of the protest group Just Stop Oil recently threw soup at Van Gogh’s ‘sunflowers’ at the National Gallery in London. The action again sparked a debate about what types of protest are most effective.

After a quick cleaning of the glass, the painting was once again on display. But critics argued that the real harm had been done, distracting the public from the cause itself (the demand that the British government reverse its support for the opening of new oil and gas fields in the North Sea ).

Proponents of more militant forms of protest often cite historical examples such as the suffragettes. Unlike the Just Stop Oil action, when suffragette Mary Richardson went to the National Gallery to attack a painting titled The Rokeby Venus, she slashed the canvas, causing extensive damage.
However, many historians argue that the suffragettes’ contribution to women’s suffrage was negligible, if not counterproductive. Such discussions often seem to rely on people’s intuitions about the impact of protest. But as a professor of cognitive psychology, I know we don’t have to rely on intuition – these are hypotheses that can be tested.

The activist’s dilemma

In a series of experiments, researchers showed people descriptions of protests and then measured their support for the protesters and the cause. Some participants read articles describing moderate protests such as peaceful marches. Others have read articles describing more extreme and sometimes violent protests, such as a fictional action in which animal rights activists drugged a security guard in order to break into a lab and remove animals from it. .
Just Stop Oil activists spray painted the wall under a pupil's copy of Leonardo

Just Stop Oil activists spray-painted the wall beneath a student’s copy of Leonardo’s ‘The Last Supper’ and glued themselves to the frame. Credit: Kristian Buus/In pictures/Getty Images

Protesters who took extreme actions were perceived to be more immoral, and participants reported lower levels of emotional connection and social identification with these “extreme” protesters. The effects of this type of action on support for the cause were somewhat mixed (and negative effects may be specific to actions that incorporate the threat of violence).

READ MORE: Three arguments why Just Stop Oil was right to target Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers”

Taken together, these findings paint a picture of the so-called activist’s dilemma: activists must choose between moderate actions that are largely ignored and more extreme actions that are successful in attracting attention but may be counter-intuitive. productive for their purposes because they tend to make people think. Some protestors.

Activists themselves tend to offer a different perspective: they say accepting personal unpopularity is simply the price to pay for the media attention they count on.”move the conversation forwardand win public support for the issue. But is this the right approach? Could the activists harm their own cause?

Hating protesters doesn’t affect support

I have conducted several experiments to answer these questions, often in collaboration with students from the University of Bristol. To influence participants’ views of protesters, we used a well-known framing effect whereby (even subtle) differences in how protests are reported have a pronounced impact, often serving to delegitimize the protest.
For example, the Daily Mail article reporting on Van Gogh’s protest called it a “stunt” that is part of a “campaign of chaos” by “rebellious eco-zealots”. The article does not mention the protesters’ request.
Last generation climate protesters after throwing mashed potatoes at Claude Monet's painting

Last Generation climate protesters after throwing mashed potatoes on Claude Monet’s painting ‘Les Meules’. Credit: Last generation/AP

Our experiments took advantage of this framing effect to test the relationship between attitudes toward the protesters themselves and toward their cause. If public support for a cause depends on what it thinks of protesters, then negative framing—which leads to less positive attitudes toward protesters—should result in lower levels of support for the demands.

But that’s not what we found. In fact, the experimental manipulations that reduced support for protesters had no impact on support for protesters’ demands.

We have replicated this finding in a range of different types of nonviolent protests, including protests against racial justice, abortion rights and climate change, and among UK, US and Polish participants (this work is in progress). preparatory course for publication). When members of the public say, “I agree with your cause, I just don’t like your methods,” we should take them at their word.

READ MORE: An Ethicist Explains Why Philanthropy Isn’t a License to Do Bad Things
Decreasing the extent to which the public identifies with you may not be helpful in building a mass movement. But high-profile actions can actually be a very effective way to increase recruitment, given that relatively few people become activists. The existence of a radical flank also seems to increase support for more moderate factions of a social movement, making those less radical factions appear.

Protest can set the agenda

Another concern may be that most of the attention gained by radical actions is not on the issue, instead focusing on what the protesters have done. However, even when this is true, the public conversation opens the space for discussion of the issue itself.

Protest plays a role in seeding the agenda. It doesn’t necessarily tell people what to think, but influences what they think. Last year’s protests in Insulate Britain are a case in point. In the months since the protests began on September 13, 2021, the number of mentions of the word “isolation” (not “Isulate”) in the UK print media has doubled.
Just Stop Oil activists stuck their hands on the frame of John Constable's

Just Stop Oil activists stuck their hands on the frame of John Constable’s ‘The Hay Wain’ and superimposed an edited image on top of the artwork. Credit: Carlos Jasso/AFP/Getty Images

Some people don’t investigate the details of an issue, but the media attention can still promote the issue in their minds. A YouGov poll released in early June 2019 showed “the environment” ranked among the public’s top three most important issues for the first time.

READ MORE: Sackler donations: why museums and galleries can get stuck with gifts, even if they don’t want them
The pollsters concluded that “the sudden rise in concern is no doubt spurred by the publicity generated for the environmental cause by Extinction Rebellion” (which had recently occupied prominent sites in central London for two weeks). There is also evidence that insulating homes has become the political agenda since the Isulate Britain protests.

The dramatic protest is not going away. The protagonists will continue to receive (mostly) negative media attention, leading to widespread public disapproval. But when we examine public support for the protesters’ demands, there is no compelling evidence that nonviolent protest is counterproductive. People may “shoot the messenger”, but they hear – at least sometimes – the message.

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Liberty University opens new art museum on campus https://911gallery.org/liberty-university-opens-new-art-museum-on-campus/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/liberty-university-opens-new-art-museum-on-campus/ Liberty University held a grand opening and ribbon cutting Thursday night for a new on-campus art museum. Todd Smith, director of the Liberty University Art Museum, said it took a lot of prayer to make the museum possible. “What I feel is first and foremost that it is God who glorifies himself, and he is […]]]>

Liberty University held a grand opening and ribbon cutting Thursday night for a new on-campus art museum.

Todd Smith, director of the Liberty University Art Museum, said it took a lot of prayer to make the museum possible.

“What I feel is first and foremost that it is God who glorifies himself, and he is going to use our students and our faculty to do the same thing when they show their work here and go back to their chosen field and the field of art,” Smith said.

Scott Hayes, dean of the School of Communication and the Arts, came to the university in 2013 and said that since then there have been talks of establishing a Liberty University Art Museum.

“To actually be able to connect all of these pieces at the end is just an incredible blessing,” Hayes said.

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The art museum is located near the School of Communication and the Arts, just down the hall from the main hall of Green Hall.

The opening of the museum and the expansion of the art space were made possible by Barbara Engstrom and her husband, Frederick, who are both supporters of LU.

Barbara Engstrom, who died in December 2021, donated her collection to the university, which included 30 of her own paintings in addition to glass and sculpted figures and photographs she collected during her travels to 99 countries.

Everett Foutz, director of development and head of planned giving at Liberty University, said that in 2013 he began contacting Engstrom about scholarships.

Foutz and Smith went to visit her and she asked them to look at her art and get a quote of how much it would cost to put it on permanent display.

Foutz said the price the university asked him to exhibit his collection was about $1.2 million. This allowed the university to expand the space, open the museum and create scholarships.

Her gallery, “Barbara A. Engstrom Gallery”, will be a permanent collection of the museum.

“She had such a generous heart, she gave to so many people, individuals and organizations,” Foutz said.

At the ribbon cutting on Thursday evening, the museum had two exhibits – a senior exhibit for art students and the Barbara A. Engstrom Gallery in the back half, which will be in the museum permanently.

Sarah Hedrick, senior and studio art major at Liberty University, presented paintings for the inauguration.

“It took many hours for several years. I didn’t start that just this semester,” Hedrick said of finishing those plays.

Hedrick pointed to a painting she did while on a mission trip to Hawaii last summer. She said she was inspired by the landscape, took a photo and returned to where they were staying and took a few hours to paint.

The eldest said it was the first show she had done in quite a while.

“It helps me, you know, get into the professional art world and introduce myself and my work,” Hedrick said.

Senior Natalie Perkins said seeing her artwork on display was “such a rewarding feeling”.

Perkins said she originally majored in social work when she entered college, but switched to studio art after two years because her heart was truly in art.

“I really felt like God was leading me to use him instead of just pushing him away like a lot of people do and it’s been such an empowering experience,” Perkins said.

Perkins said his gallery on Thursday was “kind of a ‘thank you’ to the people in my life who encouraged me to continue” on the path of art.

“I had to deal with a lot of discouragement from outside sources, but most people who [you] see here people from my life like early or high school or even college who just encouraged me to keep going and they mean the world to me,” Perkins said.

Smith said the new space is about three times larger than the gallery he had before. He hopes the art museum and permanent collection will be one of the cultural hubs of the campus and community, allowing students to see works in ways they might not have noticed before.

“For me, it’s something precious. It exposes students to a form of learning and other things that they may not have experienced before and that’s good for their education,” Smith said.

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