Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 00:16:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://911gallery.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-28T144735.431-150x150.png Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ 32 32 The exhibition at the UNM Art Museum presents the works of the transcendent painter Raymond Jonson https://911gallery.org/the-exhibition-at-the-unm-art-museum-presents-the-works-of-the-transcendent-painter-raymond-jonson/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 00:16:28 +0000 https://911gallery.org/the-exhibition-at-the-unm-art-museum-presents-the-works-of-the-transcendent-painter-raymond-jonson/ Raymond Jonson created visual harmony from instinct and intuition. His eyebrows dancing like feathered caterpillars, he believed that art could transform and uplift the world. “Cycle of time (noon)”, Raymond Jonson, 1930, oil on canvas. (Courtesy of the University of New Mexico Museum of Art) The transcendentalist painter, a professor at the University of New […]]]>

Raymond Jonson created visual harmony from instinct and intuition.

His eyebrows dancing like feathered caterpillars, he believed that art could transform and uplift the world.

“Cycle of time (noon)”, Raymond Jonson, 1930, oil on canvas. (Courtesy of the University of New Mexico Museum of Art)

The transcendentalist painter, a professor at the University of New Mexico and founder of the closed Raymond Jonson Gallery, created works on multiple canvases because he believed that a single painting could not capture vast subjects like the Grand Canyon .

The University of New Mexico Art Museum features the findings in “Visionary Modern: Raymond Jonson Trilogies, Cycles, and Portraits” through November 24.

The Iowa-born painter moved often during his childhood, initiating his formal training at the Portland Art Museum School in Oregon, according to the Smithsonian American Art Museum. In 1910 he moved to Chicago to study at the Academy of Fine Arts and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He experimented with scenography at the Chicago Little Theater. He was deeply influenced by the Chicago Armory Show of 1913 and the work of Russian-born non-objective painter Wassily Kandinsky.

But Jonson expressed a love-hate relationship with the cities, said Mary Statzer, curator of the UNM Art Museum.

After visiting Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico, he settled permanently in Santa Fe in 1924.light point

“Cycle of time (morning)”, Raymond Jonson, 1930, oil on canvas. (Courtesy University of New Mexico)

After the move, he wrote hundreds of sketches of the hills, mesas and landscapes to become spiritually familiar with the shapes, shapes and rhythms of the terrain. There he produced increasingly abstract landscapes until he developed a characteristic geometric style.

“They’re abstract, but they still refer to things in the world like the Grand Canyon,” Statzer said. “He saw all these European movements. He was also interested in the ideas of modern music and this influenced his painting. He was less interested in portraying the world and more in portraying more esoteric things. “

Raymond Jonson painting in Colorado, 1917.

In his 1930 triptych (Jonson called them trilogies) “Time Cycle”, the artist captured the rising and setting sun in biomorphic shapes and rhythms in an increasingly dark palette.

“He was a very experimental person,” Statzer said. “It was one of the first airbrush adapters. He adopted acrylic painting very early on.

In 1938, Jonson founded the Transcendentalist Painting Group with Emil Bisttram and Agnes Pelton.

In their manifesto, the artists embraced a common goal of trying to portray the world beyond physical sight and overlap with mystical and spiritual ideas.

In 1934, supported by a grant from the Works Progress Administration, Jonson painted six large frescoes for UNM and began teaching there part-time.

“The Sailor (Eric Johan Smith)”, Ramond Jonson, 1919, oil on canvas. (Courtesy of the University of New Mexico Museum of Art)

Jonson’s early portraits of his wife Vera (in 1918) and a friend in “The Sailor” (1919) reveal both his technical abilities and his theatrical background.

“There’s this strong upward light and these flat backgrounds that look like wallpaper,” Statzer said.

Light became more prominent in his work in the 1960s with “Light – A Trilogy (Polymer No. 11.)”

“Light – A Trilogy (Polymer No. 11), Raymond Jonson, 1966, acrylic on Masonite. (Courtesy of the University of New Mexico Museum of Art)

“They feel influenced by the light and space movement (a minimalist group from Southern California) of the 1960s,” Statzer said. “It stands up to the work of much younger artists of the time.”

Jonson began teaching at the University of New Mexico full time in 1950, living in the Jonson Gallery, a studio, residence, and exhibition space that had been specially built on campus for him. He became professor emeritus of art at the university in 1954 but remained director of the gallery. Jonson continued to paint and exhibit widely in the United States until his death in 1982.

The UNM Art Museum has some 600 paintings by the artist; the Jonson Gallery collection moved there in 2010.

“We have to be the biggest collector of Jonson paintings in the country,” Statzer said.

“Cycle of time (night)”, Raymond Jonson, 1930, oil on canvas. (Courtesy of the University of New Mexico Museum of Art)

“Jonson was a proponent of modernism and abstraction,” she continued. “He was well respected and the students really liked him. He is not as well known as he should be because he is a wonderful painter. These paintings really hold up.


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Black culture exhibit, food on display at the Tacoma Art Museum https://911gallery.org/black-culture-exhibit-food-on-display-at-the-tacoma-art-museum/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/black-culture-exhibit-food-on-display-at-the-tacoma-art-museum/ Every Thursday, during The Kinsey Collection’s run at the Tacoma Art Museum, explore African American history and the intersection with food through bites of local barbecue, macaroons, fried catfish and coffee on the fire. Of wood. For the first time, the TAM Cafe has partnered with local businesses – in this case, black-owned restaurants and […]]]>

Every Thursday, during The Kinsey Collection’s run at the Tacoma Art Museum, explore African American history and the intersection with food through bites of local barbecue, macaroons, fried catfish and coffee on the fire. Of wood.

For the first time, the TAM Cafe has partnered with local businesses – in this case, black-owned restaurants and bakeries – to manage food and drink once a week while the Kinsey African collection airs. American Art & History.

“When the Kinsey exhibit was first mentioned,” said Chef Tony Lang, who manages the cafe and catering events, “it is only natural as a chef for me to think about how whose food I can associate with that. “

The exhibit features more than 150 artifacts collected by Shirley and Bernard Kinsey over five decades, each representing the achievements and contributions of black people in the United States from 1595 to today. Their son Khalil Kinsey manages the collection and hosted the Tacoma Show, which opened on July 31.

In May, Lang, who grew up in Steilacoom, came up with the idea of ​​simultaneously showcasing local black-owned food and beverage businesses, drawing a line from the gallery to the kitchen.

“Everyone jumped on board really quickly,” he recently told The News Tribune.

Guest chefs included Quincy and Whitni Henry of Campfire Coffee Co., whose downtown café opened in August 2020; Warnessa Victorian of Lizzie Lou’s Comfort Food, a food truck and catering operation with a restaurant inside the Fife Harley Davidson; Brenda Miller of the Cajun and Creole food truck Velvet’s Big Easy; and Bobby Shorts of Hamhock Jones Soul Shack, a Lakewood-based truck known for live music in the Shell parking lot.

Karina Blasco of Only Oatmeal Cookies, now with a display at the Waterfront Market in Point Ruston, will be visiting on September 23.

Pastry chef Aliyah Davis’ Dowd’s BBQ and Black Magic Sweets returned for their second Thursday last week.

“It was a huge opportunity,” Martin Dowd told the News Tribune on September 16 as he served from his truck parked outside the museum on Pacific Avenue. “It was something that hadn’t been done, revolutionary if you will. It’s something to be proud of, and you want to be a part of something like that.

black biz at TAM_1.jpg
Dowd’s barbecue owner Martin Dowd hands an order for catfish and chips to a customer at his food truck parked outside the cafe at the Tacoma Art Museum on Thursday, September 16, 2021. In collaboration with With the Kinsey African American Art & History Collection currently on display, a rotation of black-owned food companies have been invited to participate in a TAM Cafe takeover! every Thursday afternoon. Drew Perine drew.perine@thenewstribune.com

Originally from North Carolina, he started his barbecue business in 2003, growing from a humble location at a Chevron gas station in Fife to a full-fledged caterer who cooks frequently for corporate events and weddings. With a decorated food truck and another on the way, Dowd will soon be opening a brick and mortar store in Fern Hill.

His father was a pit master, he said, but his cousin and self-proclaimed foster family in the Pacific Northwest taught him how to barbecue. After joining the Navy in 1990, he was stationed at Bremerton and served in the Gulf War. Her story, in a way, illustrates the connections that the Kinsey collection experience at TAM aims to make – through shared art and food, history and culture.

“I’m always looking forward to representing,” said Dowd, who will be back in October and November.

Lang, meanwhile, is busy discussing the next edition of TAM Cafe Takeover.

The collaboration was not only a first for the museum, but also for the Kinseys, he said, but its success has proven that this type of partnership works – and impacts more than the exhibition.

“We’re an anchor downtown, and that kind of help brings everyone together,” Lang said.

He’s already invited other local restaurants to see the Kinsey takeover in action, in anticipation of collaborating on future exhibitions.

In addition to the cafe takeover, TAM and The Kinsey Collection have teamed up with ETC Tacoma’s Umi Wagoner on exclusive apparel, on sale now in the gift shop and online.

TAM CAFE TAKING CONTROL – THE KINSEY COLLECTION

▪ Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, 253-272-4258, tacomaartmuseum.org

▪ Details: Black-owned restaurants appear every Thursday; times vary, check the calendar of events and social media for updates

▪ Free entry to the museum on Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., no ticket required to visit the café

Kristine Sherred joined The News Tribune in December 2019, after a decade in Chicago where she worked for restaurants, a liquor wholesaler and a food bookstore. Previously, she covered the food sector for Industry Dive and William Reed. Find her on Instagram @kcsherred and Twitter @kriscarasher.



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round glass facade greets visitors to the transformation of the Denver Art Museum https://911gallery.org/round-glass-facade-greets-visitors-to-the-transformation-of-the-denver-art-museum/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 10:52:30 +0000 https://911gallery.org/round-glass-facade-greets-visitors-to-the-transformation-of-the-denver-art-museum/ the imposing denver art museum is renewed and expanded the denver art museum (DAM) will reopen to the public next month, October 24, 2021 – after being partially closed for many years – with its expanded and revised campus designed by architects machado silvetti and fentress. the original lanny and sharon martin building – formerly […]]]>

the imposing denver art museum is renewed and expanded

the denver art museum (DAM) will reopen to the public next month, October 24, 2021 – after being partially closed for many years – with its expanded and revised campus designed by architects machado silvetti and fentress.

the original lanny and sharon martin building – formerly called north building or ponti – was designed by famous italian architect gio ponti and opened in 1971 as a seven-story tower; it was the very first high-rise art museum and its only completed building in north america. millions of reflective tiles cover the exterior of the building, and its twin-tower facade has long been an iconic feature of the city. this fall, the museum unveils the $ 150 million renovation and expansion project, while celebrating the inauguration of the martin building on its 50th anniversary.

all images courtesy of the denver art museum (DAM)

a transparent elliptical facade accessible from all sides

designed by american firms machado silvetti and fentress architects, and built by saunders construction, the changes incorporate a new visitor center, relocated galleries and creative spaces for education, events and catering. the new complex is characterized by the oval glass structure, which welcomes visitors and seamlessly connects all aspects of the museum campus. Spanning 50,000 square feet (4,645 m²) and spanning two levels, the sie Visitor Center is distinguished by its unique façade, which is comprised of a series of curved structural glass panels with insulating glazing.

“To create the new sie visitor center within the rich architectural context of Denver’s Golden Triangle Creative District, it was essential for us to design a structure that simultaneously dialogues with the vibrant visual language of ponti and studio designs. libeskind, while providing a connection to the Museum. With its elliptical shape accessible from all angles and its transparent glass facade, the sie visitor center is an inviting and bright beacon to welcome all visitors. said jorge silvetti, director of machado silvetti. “An unprecedented feat of engineering and the first building to use curved glass panels in this way.”

round glass facade greets visitors to the transformation of the Denver Art Museum
the original steel tube-shaped entrance has been restored

the museum acts as a catalyst for the redevelopment of the “golden triangle”

after the dynamic expansion and addition to the existing museum, – dubbed the Hamilton building designed by american architect daniel libeskind, and opened in 2006 – the museum served as a catalyst for the revival of the surrounding creative district of the ‘triangle of gold”. over the past decade, three adjacent museums have opened in the neighborhood, creating a cultural hub; the clyfford still museum, the colorado history center and the kirkland museum of fine and decorative arts. Along with this, new residential and commercial projects, independent art galleries, restaurants and retail outlets, form a vibrant district with arts and culture as a focal point.

the project includes an extension including a new gallery and public space, realizing the ponti vision for visitor access to remarkable ground views, the addition of skylights that reveal new building design angles and exterior improvements such as lighting and revitalizing the glass tiles on the facade of the building.

round glass facade greets visitors to the transformation of the Denver Art Museum
the original building is covered with millions of reflective tiles

a series of creative activities and events will follow the reopening of the martin building. the museum opens its completed campus to the public on sunday 24 october, with free entry for all. reservations are available from September 17 on the museum website (available here).

round glass facade greets visitors to the transformation of the Denver Art Museum
elliptical shaped reception center

elliptical glass facade to welcome visitors to the Denver Art Museum's transformation this fall
night view of the transparent reception center


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NMSU Art Museum pop-up show honoring deceased canine staff member https://911gallery.org/nmsu-art-museum-pop-up-show-honoring-deceased-canine-staff-member/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:57:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/nmsu-art-museum-pop-up-show-honoring-deceased-canine-staff-member/ NMSU Press Release by Amanda Adame The New Mexico State University Art Museum will present a new pop-up exhibition, “St. Stella: Our Lady, Star of the Desert” in honor of the late dog of museum director Marisa Sage, Stella Sage, a beloved member on all fours from the art department of the NMSU. The pop-up […]]]>

NMSU Press Release by Amanda Adame

The New Mexico State University Art Museum will present a new pop-up exhibition, “St. Stella: Our Lady, Star of the Desert” in honor of the late dog of museum director Marisa Sage, Stella Sage, a beloved member on all fours from the art department of the NMSU.

The pop-up exhibition will be on display in the Mullennix Bridge Gallery inside the Devasthali Hall from Wednesday to Saturday from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. until October 1.

Curated by Craig Cully, Associate Professor of Painting and Drawing, the exhibition features works inspired by the memory of Stella, the punk English Bulldog who left a paw print on students, staff, faculty and members of the the NMSU community and Las Cruces.

Sage saved Stella in 2011 while living in Brooklyn. After being a “gallery assistant” for Sage’s “Like The Spice Gallery,” Stella moved with Sage to New Mexico when she accepted her position in the NMSU art department in 2014. Stella has become a part of every day at DW Williams Hall and has been described as “spirited, humorous and with an innate ability to seek out those in need of a little extra love”.

“One day at school, a student came to me and said ‘are you Stella’s mother? Sometimes knowing that I’ll see her in the building is the only thing that gets me up and here in the morning, ”Sage recalls.

“Stella lived a life many could only dream of, traveling the country from coast to coast, acting as the muse of many talented artists, the assistant of many skilled workers and the lover of very young children with which she could walk around. She died as she lived, in a surge of glory and love.

The Art Museum and Art Department will host an in-person reception to celebrate Stella’s life at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, September 29 at Devasthali Hall.

To learn more about this exhibit, please visit https://uam.nmsu.edu, or call Art Museum Coordinator Jasmine Herrera at 575-646-2545 or email artmuseum@nmsu.edu.


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Zhejiang Art Museum contributes to fine arts education https://911gallery.org/zhejiang-art-museum-contributes-to-fine-arts-education/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:56:15 +0000 https://911gallery.org/zhejiang-art-museum-contributes-to-fine-arts-education/ The Zhejiang Art Museum and the Hangzhou Basic Education Research Office launched a plan to support fine arts education in the province on September 8. The museum, based in Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province, donated 700,000 yuan ($ 108,640) of high-profile painting albums to 170 primary and secondary schools in the city on September 8. […]]]>

The Zhejiang Art Museum and the Hangzhou Basic Education Research Office launched a plan to support fine arts education in the province on September 8.

The museum, based in Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province, donated 700,000 yuan ($ 108,640) of high-profile painting albums to 170 primary and secondary schools in the city on September 8.

Ying Jinfei, curator of the museum, said that the Zhejiang Art Museum is a key art gallery at the national level which has many resources related to books and artists, and will proactively participate in building public culture and make advance the teaching of fine arts in school. campus.

Over the next two years, the museum plans to gradually make its digital resources of modern and contemporary Chinese fine art, which includes approximately 50,000 masterpieces in its collection, available to teachers of fine arts. arts of primary and secondary schools in the city.

The museum will also cooperate with the Hangzhou Basic Education Research Office in China to organize campus activities and conduct surveys to explore the most effective approach to teaching fine arts to local people. primary and secondary students.

In cooperation with the China Academy of Art, the museum will offer fine arts teachers in primary and secondary schools a series of free training programs in the coming weeks.

Staff members move donated painting albums to a warehouse at the Zhejiang Art Museum. [Photo/zj.zjol.com.cn]

Media contact
Company Name: Hangzhou Municipal Government Information Office
Contact: Cai jingwen
E-mail: Send an email
Telephone: 0510-68559077
Country: China
Website: http://www.ehangzhou.gov.cn/


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Tulane appoints Maurita Poole as director of Newcomb Art Museum https://911gallery.org/tulane-appoints-maurita-poole-as-director-of-newcomb-art-museum/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 13:26:35 +0000 https://911gallery.org/tulane-appoints-maurita-poole-as-director-of-newcomb-art-museum/ Maurita N. Poole NEW ORLEANS – Maurita N. Poole, PhD, Director and Curator of the Atlanta Clark University Museum, has accepted the appointment as the new Director of the Newcomb Art Museum at Tulane University. Poole will oversee the museum, which has been awarded the status of Best Museum or Gallery in the State of […]]]>
Maurita N. Poole

NEW ORLEANS – Maurita N. Poole, PhD, Director and Curator of the Atlanta Clark University Museum, has accepted the appointment as the new Director of the Newcomb Art Museum at Tulane University.

Poole will oversee the museum, which has been awarded the status of Best Museum or Gallery in the State of Louisiana and one of the Top 25 in the United States for the past five years by the American Art Prize.

The mission of the Newcomb Art Museum at Tulane University builds on Newcomb College’s legacy of education, social enterprise, and artistic experience. Featuring inspiring exhibits and programs that engage communities both on and off campus, the museum fosters the creative exchange of ideas and interdisciplinary collaborations around innovative art and design. In addition, the museum preserves and promotes scholarship on the Newcomb and Tulane art collections.

“I am delighted to join an institution like the Newcomb Art Museum (NAM) in Tulane because of its commitment to developing socially engaged initiatives,” said Poole. “In these unprecedented times, I think NAM is a great place to explore how the visual arts can help alleviate suffering and promote social change.”

“I am delighted to see the progress of the Newcomb Art Museum under the direction of Maurita. She has done a fabulous job at the Clark Atlanta University Art Museum and has the perfect experience to ensure that NAM continues to do relevant, provocative and inspiring work, and engages an audience that reaches our entire campus and New Orleans ” said Robin Forman, Tulane’s senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

Poole comes to Tulane after a six-year stint as director of the Clark Atlanta University Art Museum (CAUAM). His focus was on strengthening the organization’s infrastructure and providing opportunities for the next generation of museum professionals. She oversaw the Tina Dunkley Fellowship in American Art, a collaborative initiative on Diversity in Art Museum Leadership (DAMLI) involving CAUAM, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) and the Zuckerman Museum of Art (ZMA) . In addition, she has developed the Black Optics Artist Residency, a platform that connects artists of African American South with artists and institutions from the Global South.

Poole was in the Center for Curatorial Leadership Class of 2020. His curatorial projects focused on modern and contemporary art from Africa and the African Diaspora and were supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Ford Foundation and The Walton Family Foundation.

Poole received his doctorate in cultural anthropology from Emory University and his professional training at the Williams College Museum of Art, the Walters Art Museum, the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, and the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art. Poole received his BA in Arabic and Government from Georgetown University.


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News Office | ILLINOIS https://911gallery.org/news-office-illinois/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 15:03:06 +0000 https://911gallery.org/news-office-illinois/ CHAMPAIGN, Ill. – A retrospective of the work of photographer Hal Fischer, alumnus of the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, presents the breadth of his career and examines his development as an artist. “Hal Fischer Photographs: Seriality, Sexuality, Semiotics” runs until December 22 at the Krannert Art Museum. The […]]]>

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. – A retrospective of the work of photographer Hal Fischer, alumnus of the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, presents the breadth of his career and examines his development as an artist.

“Hal Fischer Photographs: Seriality, Sexuality, Semiotics” runs until December 22 at the Krannert Art Museum. The exhibit features Fisher’s best-known work – a series of photographs focusing on gay life in the 1970s in San Francisco, a period of gay liberation before the AIDS crisis.

It also includes Fischer’s early work that has never been shown, including photographs he took as an undergraduate student at U. of I. and those he took shortly after arriving in San Francisco. These early photographs show Fischer’s experimentation with techniques and subjects he used throughout his career, said Tim Dean, guest curator of the exhibit and Illinois English professor whose research focus on the politics and ethics of sexually explicit visual representation.

“The constant interplay between word and image is a concern that informs all of Fischer’s work,” said Dean, who is particularly interested in the vocabularies available at different historical times to talk about sex.

“There are interesting continuities. The well-known series has so many points of origin in the work he was doing as a very young man here at U. of I., including his humor, ”said KAM director Jon Seydl.

Hal Fischer, “Chicago Saleswoman,” 1972. Gelatin silver print, 5.75 x 7.0625 in.

Courtesy of the artist © Hal Fischer

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Fischer received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from U. of I. in 1973. He received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the School of Art and Design in 2019. While studying art in Illinois, the photography program had a strong emphasis on fine art. -traditional arts. photography and on alternative processes, Fischer said. Both are evident in his photographs.

Photo of Hal Fischer's work hanging in a gallery at the Krannert Art Museum.

The exhibit includes some of Fischer’s bleached prints from his early work in San Francisco, center, and his “Gay Semiotics” series, right.

“Hal Fischer Photographs: Seriality, Sexuality, Semiotics”, installation view at the Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2021.

Photo of Julia Nucci Kelly

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In his early work in San Francisco, Fischer manipulated images by bleaching and solarization, and typically added ink-drawn text and diagrams directly onto the print. In many images, including a bleached and glued print of a beach scene, he has superimposed a grid over the photograph.

“In my very early manipulation work, it’s not the words (that were added), but there is the idea that I’m just not happy with the image alone. I’m doing something about it, ”Fischer said.

While taking photographs, he also wrote art reviews – thinking and working in both pictures and words. His photographic series “Gay Semiotics” combines text printed in photographs to note the meaning of objects his subjects wear, such as an earring, handkerchief or key ring.

“There’s a whole strategy there,” Fischer said. “I take care of busy subjects and I take photographs very influenced by media images. They are intentionally a bit banal. The text is a strategy to say, “This is really what’s happening in this photo” and to use humor to defuse it and give it a punchline. I celebrated gay life in the 1970s, but presented it in an accessible way.

The photography of Hal Fischer

Hal Fischer, “Archetypal Media Image: Leather,” from “Gay Semiotics,” 1977; printed 2014. Pigmented inkjet on porous resinous coated paper, edition 5 of 45. Museum purchase through the Robert and Sonia Carringer Art Acquisitions Fund. 2019-2-1.9.

Courtesy of the Krannert Art Museum

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Dean said Fischer’s photographs reproduced the visual codes of gay men against the conventions of photographic communication.

Photo of Hal Fischer's work hanging in a gallery at the Krannert Art Museum.

The exhibition includes portraits and black-and-white photographs with layered colors that Fischer took while a student at U. of I ..

“Hal Fischer Photographs: Seriality, Sexuality, Semiotics”, installation view at the Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2021.

Photo of Julia Nucci Kelly

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“He is aware and skeptical of how photography has been co-opted by the advertising industry, and how an object can be framed in a certain way to make it particularly attractive and desirable. He’s very critical about this and how gay culture has encouraged men to come forward in a certain way through camera angles, clothes and hairstyles, even before Instagram, ”Dean said.

The photography of Hal Fischer

Hal Fischer, “The Best Friend,” from “Boy-Friends,” 1979; printed 2016. Pigment inkjet on porous resinous coated paper, edition 2 of 15. Museum purchase through the Robert and Sonia Carringer Art Acquisitions Fund. 2019-2-3.1.

Courtesy of the Krannert Art Museum

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“Boy-Friends” uses snapshots Fischer took of men he had had a romantic interaction with. Fischer said he chose shots to describe a particular type of interaction; the accompanying text summarizes each experience. “Boy-Friends” was created at a time when photographers were starting to look beyond fine art photography – to snapshots, advertising, fashion, and other utilitarian uses.

“There is a tension between capturing the individuality (of the subject) and making the individual a type. For example, what you see in the series “Boy-Friends” in the censorship bars on the faces of all the guys: everyone is an individual, but it also prevents you from seeing them, “Dean said.

The photography of Hal Fischer

Hal Fischer, “2:00 pm”, from “18th near Castro St. x 24”, 1978; printed 2018. Pigmented inkjet on porous resinous coated paper, edition 1 of 15. Museum purchase through the Robert and Sonia Carringer Art Acquisitions Fund. 2019-2-2.6.

Courtesy of the Krannert Art Museum

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Fischer described his work “18th near Castro St. x 24” as a “performance piece of duration”. He photographed a bus stop bench every hour for 24 hours from a fixed perspective, and he uses the accompanying text to record his observations and comments about visitors to the bench.

Fischer quit photography in 1980, continuing his career as an art writer and museum consultant. Fisher, who worked closely with Dean in preparing for the KAM exhibit, said he hoped it would be helpful for students to see the trajectory of his work and how it evolved from his student days to the heyday of his career.

Fischer and Dean will discuss the exhibit in a sold-out conversation on September 23 at 2 p.m. KAM will host a public opening night on September 24 from 5 to 8 p.m.

Fischer will also be at KAM on November 6 for a symposium of international scholars who will discuss his work. The symposium is made possible by the Terra Foundation for American Art. It is free and open to the public.

Dean and the English Department’s Creative Writing Program hosted a related poetry competition for poems that were inspired by Fischer’s photographs. The poetry will be published in Ninth Letter, the program’s literary arts journal.


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Limitless Ceramic Art on Display at WCU Fine Art Museum | Life https://911gallery.org/limitless-ceramic-art-on-display-at-wcu-fine-art-museum-life/ Fri, 10 Sep 2021 13:56:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/limitless-ceramic-art-on-display-at-wcu-fine-art-museum-life/ Contemporary Clay 2021 is on view at the Western Carolina University Fine Art Museum until December 10, 2021. The exhibition and special events series are free and open to the public. Contemporary Clay 2021 brings together artists from diverse backgrounds who push boundaries on topics such as race, culture, sexuality, gender and class. Hosted by […]]]>

Contemporary Clay 2021 is on view at the Western Carolina University Fine Art Museum until December 10, 2021. The exhibition and special events series are free and open to the public.

Contemporary Clay 2021 brings together artists from diverse backgrounds who push boundaries on topics such as race, culture, sexuality, gender and class. Hosted by Heather Mae Erickson, Associate Professor of Ceramics at WCU, Contemporary Clay 2021 examines the ever-expanding field of American-made ceramics. The exhibition encourages viewers to consider the concepts, processes and context of clay in contemporary art.

The special event series, “Contemporary Clay Conversations,” features various presenters who are leaders in the field of ceramics. The series launches on September 30 at 12 noon is the zoom talk, “Clay is Hot”, with Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy, essayist for the Contemporary Clay 2021 exhibition catalog. Angelik is a curator, writer and artistic administrator of the contemporary art and crafts based in New York and Los Angeles, focusing on ceramics. His current research focuses on the “aesthetics of optimism” and the subversive power of humor, kindness and leisure as tools of protest. Amplifying the voice of BIPOC artists is at the heart of its practice. She is assistant curator at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York.

Then, for “Conversations in Contemporary Clay”, two round tables of exhibiting artists and industry pioneers will take place on Wednesday, October 6 from 12 noon to 3:30 p.m., followed by an in-person reception and a conference. Thursday, October 7. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Bardo Arts Center. More information on the series, the exhibiting artists and the exhibition is available at arts.wcu.edu/contemporaryclay. A full calendar of events and associated zoom links will be available on the above website soon.

The Bardo Arts Center’s WCU Museum of Fine Arts is located at 199 Centennial Drive, Cullowhee. This museum is open Tuesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursday until 7 p.m.


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Taos Art Museum in Fechin Studio exhibitions | Arts https://911gallery.org/taos-art-museum-in-fechin-studio-exhibitions-arts/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/taos-art-museum-in-fechin-studio-exhibitions-arts/ TaArt Museum At Fechin Studio, the exhibition welcomes a host of eclectic and deeply talented Taos artists starting this month. Christy Schoedinger Coleman, executive director of the museum, said the artist lineup includes the series premiere, Peggy McGivern which opens September 11 through October 17, followed by Zoë Zimmerman exhibiting her pandemic still lifes titled […]]]>

TaArt Museum At Fechin Studio, the exhibition welcomes a host of eclectic and deeply talented Taos artists starting this month.

Christy Schoedinger Coleman, executive director of the museum, said the artist lineup includes the series premiere, Peggy McGivern which opens September 11 through October 17, followed by Zoë Zimmerman exhibiting her pandemic still lifes titled “Covanditas” . Matt Thomas creates works inspired by Nicolai Fechin for a show from December 2021 to January 2022. In late winter and early spring 2022 there will be studio works by Izumi Yokoyama and Solange Roberdeau.

There is an opening reception at the Taos Art Museum this Saturday (September 11) from 1 pm to 3 pm for the Peggy McGivern show, titled “When I was six, I was a horse”. This exhibition is a retrospective of McGivern’s 40-year career as a professional artist and is held [at the time of the release of] his illustrated memoir of the same name has just published, “When I was six, I was a horse”.

McGivern works serially with a color palette reminiscent of the 1940s – richly toned burnt oranges and rusty reds with subtle brass and lime green, held together by warm plum and soft charcoal shadows she portrays the people and places she encountered on her travels around the world.

Tempo met McGivern and asked him a few questions about his work and process. Here are the highlights.

What brought you to Taos, what sustains you here?

My mother was an artist and when I was young she always told me about this beautiful place, so when I traveled for my art I would come and discover it for myself. I started exhibiting my work at Gallery A years ago at Taos in 2005, then at Act One and now at Jones Walker of Taos. I show across the southwest to Denver, Scottsdale and to Giacobbee Fritz in Santa Fe. My husband and I bought a home here 13 years ago while we were still living and working in Denver. I traveled to Taos sometimes three times a month to paint, so when my husband retired we were delighted to be here full time. My gallery, Jones Walker of Taos, does a fabulous job for me.

Please describe your creative process.

I work with all mediums, sometimes together. I start with a blind outline drawing, it gives me exaggerated lines and movements. I block in color, sometimes using the opposite color I’m going to end up with. It will give me depth. Then I will apply layer after layer and scrape until I get what I want.

Toulouse-Lautrec, Richard Diebenkorn, Nathan Oliveira, Milton Avery and my mother.

Why is this exhibition important to you?

This retrospective tells the story of my artistic journey for more than 40 years as a professional artist. The work in the series is one of my best work ever. This ranges from past work from the 1980s to the present day. I will also have a dedication of my illustrated book “When I was six years old, I was a horse”, which is the title of the retrospective. I had planned this retrospective a year ago but we canceled it because of the coronavirus. Now we’re moving forward with the show even though the Delta variant is here, so I feel like I’ve been preparing for this show for years.

Being in the Fechin Studio is meaningful. I feel a connection with the artists who came before me. Taos is unique in that sense. Christy [Schoedinger Coleman] and everyone on the board greeted me and also welcomed every new idea I had for the show. I think they are open to all artists in the same way.

What can our readers expect to see in the exhibit?

They will see the painting “When I was six years old, I was a horse” and many other paintings published in the book of the same name. There will be more than 75 paintings in the exhibition, most of which will be for sale. Some works are on loan from corporate and private collections. For example, the title painting belongs to Denver Children’s Hospital.

How did you get through the pandemic, how did it affect your creativity?

Much more creative. Unfortunately my retrospective got canceled, but it just gave me an extra year to create.

Yes! When I teach a workshop, everyone in the class is elated by the time it ends. Art gives us hope. We are not war, we are not hate, we are not superficial. The creative spirit lives in each of us.


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Upcoming Minnesota Marine Art Museum Exhibitions | Culture & Leisure https://911gallery.org/upcoming-minnesota-marine-art-museum-exhibitions-culture-leisure/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 15:58:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/upcoming-minnesota-marine-art-museum-exhibitions-culture-leisure/ The north coast of Minnesota is the focus of the upcoming “Dudley Edmondson: Northern Waters” exhibit, which opens September 10, 2021 at the Minnesota Marine Art Museum (MMAM) in Winona. Dudley Edmonson is an author, speaker, wildlife photographer and filmmaker from Duluth, Minn. This exhibit features photographs and videos exploring the north shore of Lake […]]]>

The north coast of Minnesota is the focus of the upcoming “Dudley Edmondson: Northern Waters” exhibit, which opens September 10, 2021 at the Minnesota Marine Art Museum (MMAM) in Winona. Dudley Edmonson is an author, speaker, wildlife photographer and filmmaker from Duluth, Minn. This exhibit features photographs and videos exploring the north shore of Lake Superior, its tributaries, and surrounding waters over four seasons, in their many moods. Dudley’s photographic career spans nearly three decades, and his work has been featured in galleries and in nearly 100 publications around the world. “The museum is proud to exhibit the work of photographer, videographer, author and outdoor enthusiast Dudley Edmondson,” said Jon Swanson, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions at MMAM. “His knowledge and passion for Minnesota’s wilderness and wildlife inspires us all to get out there and explore the beauty of our state.” Outdoor enthusiast and bird watcher, Edmondson’s passion is nature and people of color outside. He is the author of the flagship book “Black & Brown Faces in America’s Wild Places”,

profiling African Americans in non-traditional vocations and outdoor activities. Edmondson’s goal is to create a set of “outdoor role models” for the African American community. “Dudley Edmondson: Northern Waters” runs until January 2, 2022. For more information and the full exhibition schedule, visit www.mmam.org/exhibitons. There is always something new to discover at the Minnesota Marine Art Museum, your nonprofit art museum that invites visitors to have meaningful visual art experiences through education and exhibitions that explore the current and historical human relationship with water. It is located at 800 Riverview Drive in Winona and is surrounded by acres of native prairie gardens along the Mississippi River. The opening hours of the MMAM gallery and store are Tuesday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


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