Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 13:07:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://911gallery.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-28T144735.431-150x150.png Art museum – 911 Gallery http://911gallery.org/ 32 32 At the Parrish Art Museum, Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont organize a collective exhibition that breaks the noise https://911gallery.org/at-the-parrish-art-museum-mickalene-thomas-and-racquel-chevremont-organize-a-collective-exhibition-that-breaks-the-noise/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 13:07:06 +0000 https://911gallery.org/at-the-parrish-art-museum-mickalene-thomas-and-racquel-chevremont-organize-a-collective-exhibition-that-breaks-the-noise/ In the bright, barn-inspired environment of the Parrish Museum of Art designed by Herzog and de Meuron in Water Mill, New York, the group exhibition “Set It Off” features artists who “engage the monumental, the site specific and/or immersive.This trio of concerns could be taken as summarizing the practice of architecture – monument, place, environment […]]]>

In the bright, barn-inspired environment of the Parrish Museum of Art designed by Herzog and de Meuron in Water Mill, New York, the group exhibition “Set It Off” features artists who “engage the monumental, the site specific and/or immersive.This trio of concerns could be taken as summarizing the practice of architecture – monument, place, environment – ​​and the work produces, within a distinctive and well-known building, its own spatial relationships.

Across four halls and an outdoor space, the show’s attention to each of its moments feels like a series of one-and-two exhibitions. But as a whole, it is part of a narrative that considers the experience of being situated in a body, a family and a world.

Torkwase Dyson gives a restrained account of place, expressed through formal geometry and a subtle concern for the built environment. His non-Euclidean studies play with different thicknesses of paint. “What’s new to say about monochrome? the paintings initially seem to pose, approaching the question from multiple black angles on the same canvas. Overlapping rectangles and bursts of quasi-diacritical white marks suggest all the ways a surface can be aware of its edge, like how a person in a room can always be half-aware of where the door is. and how to get there.

Thus, some canvases acquire an architectural dimension. They are like blueprints or renderings of future and past buildings, though they sublimate this suggestion of habitation in deep slicks of glossy black paint. In The Horizon 01 (2017) and The Horizon 02 (2017), the paintings’ spatial awareness extends beyond the rooms and out to the wide exterior, much like the tall windows set into the gallery walls reveal the surrounding landscape, green-gray and whipped by occasional rain the day I visited.

Dyson’s paintings delve deeper as you look at them while across the room, Kameelah Janan Rasheed’s work also takes long thought to allow bits of torn language to fit into a new meaning. It is perhaps in this corpus that the show’s claim to take the spatial into account must go the furthest, but space is here formulated according to language. The diacritic – a ghostly presence in Dyson’s work – is a way of thinking about the role of different elements in Rasheed’s wall installation, which presents a numbered progression from silent video to deconstructed painting.

The repeated phrase “I’m not done” stencilled on the wall suggests a language with its own temporality, reformulating itself through the avatars of bodies and gestures. The silent mouth of the video states something urgent and impossible; its loop is never heard and never done. The waterlogged saturation of the paint on overlapping scraps of paper is quite different from Dyson’s layered blacks but also evokes a navigable space. The use of pigment runs the gamut, from typographical language to mute blobs and drops: anything that can be done in an attempt to communicate, but with uncertain results. Likewise, the teeth and tongue of the video, multiplied, suggest the curious overlapping of concrete and abstract, flesh and phoneme from which language is produced.

In another room, the flesh is threatened where the works of Kennedy Yanko and Karyn Olivier clash and reflect. In Yanko’s monuments to the antimonumental, industrial components are crumpled, distorted and then embraced by a skin of paint, whose soft surface reveals less of the catastrophe that threw them together. It is an apocalyptic aesthetic of impact whose embrace transmits the tenderness of the aftermath. Suspended above the ground, the sculptures draw attention both to the weight of their materials and to their unexpected lightness, vulnerability made ultra-concrete.

There is also in Olivier’s work an ambivalence between embrace and threat. An asphaltic substance usually used as tar roofing engulfs or cocoons photographs of unattractive fragments of urban assemblages: corners of buildings with walkways on which tiny figures slump on benches, a downed tree surrounded by drab houses, piles of bricks with seemingly discarded clothes. These images might have a private meaning, or they might as well mean nothing, but now, encased in tar, these vignettes suggest convergences between accident and intention; turns of feeling, light or perception, and fleeting sensations of home. In the middle of the gallery, How many ways can you disappear (2021) is a bunch of ropes, lockers and buoys. With tarmac photographs all around me, I thought of the artist as a fisherman of moments, immersed in an anonymous urban ocean. But on reading the work, I discover that Olivier herself had cast her mind further, thinking of the sea salt exchanged for slaves in ancient Greece. Like the juxtapositions of photographs, both strange and banal, commerce and domination produce surreal equivalences that structure daily life.

These two pairs—Dyson and Rasheed; Yanko and Olivier — are where the thoughtful curation of Racquel Chevremont and Mickalene Thomas (Deux Femmes Noires) is most evident: the placement of the works uncovers assonances that refract through each. Artists February James and Leilah Babirye are assigned an entire room each, where the tempo of the exhibition slows down. Babirye’s sculptures are complex couples in themselves. They bring together the aesthetic traditions of Kampala, Uganda, where she was born and raised, and the debris found in her current New York home; they unify the experience of being African and the experience of being gay; they combine traditional sculptural techniques with modern materials suggesting different forms of technical mediation. The wooden figures are tangled with flattened pop cans, wires, bicycle chains, pliers and bolts.

James’ paintings and sculptures are full of people: visible and invisible, self and other, living and dead. The entire book titled These are my ghosts to sit with resembles a theatrical setting in which the spirits perform as themselves. One wall is lined with expressive, exhausted faces in black and white, tiny webs with thick drops of flower-like fruit impasto. Paintings of women hang on other walls like icons of the Virgin Mary. A large-scale portrait highlights James’ attention to the gaze: there are yellow-tinted eyes in an exaggerated close-up, imperfectly combed eyebrows, and a third eye lurking like an afterthought under a coat of paint on the forehead.

More Icons of James: Ten striking works on paper feature faces in which layers of watercolor and ink create remarkably precise expressions and provide the distinct contours of personality. These faces, never seen before, are deeply familiar. The room is a place where they can all meet. The furniture appears to have developed pigmented mold, like dried ectoplasm. There is a yellow-paneled armoire with a haloed woman at its center, and an unoccupied table and two chairs on which invisible ghosts sit either side of a playful vase of fake flowers.

Whether it’s a room, a city, a nation or a language, the self – as the deeply personal works of “Set It Off” suggest – is always inflected by its location. The task is to find entry and exit routes.

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Asian Art Museum’s ‘Seeing Gender’ Exhibit Considers Past and Present – and More https://911gallery.org/asian-art-museums-seeing-gender-exhibit-considers-past-and-present-and-more/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:32:22 +0000 https://911gallery.org/asian-art-museums-seeing-gender-exhibit-considers-past-and-present-and-more/ By JL Odom Gender is many things – complex, multifaceted, culturally significant, always relevant. And it’s a concept that four curators from the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco decided to tackle in the form of an exhibition. According to Megan Merritt, curator of the Asian Art Museum, “We wanted something that was topical, that […]]]>

By JL Odom

Gender is many things – complex, multifaceted, culturally significant, always relevant. And it’s a concept that four curators from the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco decided to tackle in the form of an exhibition.

According to Megan Merritt, curator of the Asian Art Museum, “We wanted something that was topical, that had bite, and that we really wanted to engage with and look at our collection through.”

Until September 5, visitors to the museum can admire “Seeing Gender”, a collection of 17 pieces arranged side by side in the Tateuchi gallery. The exhibition is unique in its focus on the genre to see, consider and appreciate Asian art – to see beyond the binary through a range of historical and contemporary pieces, spanning cultures, regions of Asia and periods. The oldest artwork dates back to 840, with the most recent piece created in 2014.

Merritt shares that working with fellow curators Maya Hara, Shinhwa Koo and Joanna Lee was a great opportunity to come together and decide on a particular exhibition theme. As she explains, previous exhibitions at the Museum of Asian Art had explicitly focused on the “body,” such as the “Divine Bodies” exhibition which examined how divinity was represented through postures, clothing, and dynasty. other bodily aspects. But positioning “gender” at the center of attention is a first for the museum.

Merritt comments, “In this exhibition, we’re using gender as a lens through which to look at our collection, and that’s never been done before. So that was really something we wanted to address and examine, particularly being in the Bay area.”

When exploring exhibition ideas, the location of the Asian Art Museum came to mind. Merritt explains, “We are in the heart of the Tenderloin and Civic Center neighborhoods, which have historically been symbolic places of resistance among LGBTQ+ communities. So we felt the need to bring gender to the fore, because gender and sexuality are at the heart of conversations that our society has today.”


She adds: “Over the past few months, the news cycle has brought to light a lot of troubling legislation regarding young trans and gay people. But beyond that, I think we’re seeing some really positive steps in the right direction. ..like with Bay to Breakers.”

For the first time in its long history, San Francisco’s iconic Bay to Breakers offered rewards to the top non-binary runners in this year’s race. In years past, it has only recognized winners in the “women’s” and “men’s” categories. Locally, inclusivity efforts like this – for the many people whose gender identity does not conform to the binary – are becoming more prevalent. The curators took these aspects into account when creating “Seeing Gender”.

Merritt explains, “I think, especially in the Bay Area, people are starting to feel comfortable sharing their favorite pronouns, dressing in a way that’s more comfortable and true to their preferred identities. So that was something that we really wanted to celebrate and kind of shine the light on.”

To achieve these goals, Merritt et al. incorporated the views of ‘interpretation partners’ and interns from the Museum of Asian Art to complement the artwork on display. The partnership with local scholars, writers and artists guided the development of the exhibition.

According to Merritt, “They focus on gender in their academic life but also in their artistic life, so they were invaluable to our creative process. They reviewed all of our texts that we wrote; they contributed their own first-person panels at the exhibition.”

Each member of this advisory board has written something that has touched them, for example about a work of art in the gallery or a particular concept.

Of their contributions, Merritt shares, “It really gave a nice nuance to the gallery and [was] something the curators couldn’t provide. We’re so used to providing all the historical context of the art, and we could talk about the artwork, but we really couldn’t add that intimate dimension, and they brought it to the galleries. And I think that was such a beautiful element.”

Merritt and the other curators also worked with the museum’s Art Speak interns, from various local San Francisco public high schools, to create a video for the exhibit. For the video, they were asked to answer several gender-related questions, such as how they view gender in their daily lives, how they change their gender code depending on their location and social background – for example, in high school and among peers. about home with their families – and how gender “plays” for them.

Said Merritt of the interns’ participation, “It was so cool to work with Gen Z and hear how they think about gender because it’s so different from how many of us, and a lot of our visitors older, were able to grow up with [gender] and can think about it in their life. Adding these different voices – having a diverse didactic approach, which is a bit experimental for the museum – was a really fun way to incorporate Asian American voices and also voices from our community.”

These thoughtful components of the exhibition, as well as the pieces themselves, offer visitors the opportunity to reflect on gender – past, present and future, binary and beyond.

“Seeing Gender” runs through September 5 at the Asian Art Museum, 200 Larkin St., San Francisco. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Friday to Monday from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursdays. For more information and tickets, $10 to $25, visit https://asianart.org/.

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Copyright © 2022 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, redistribution, or other reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited.

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Get Crafty: Holiday Fun at the Shepparton Art Museum https://911gallery.org/get-crafty-holiday-fun-at-the-shepparton-art-museum/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 05:10:56 +0000 https://911gallery.org/get-crafty-holiday-fun-at-the-shepparton-art-museum/ Creatives: Rachel Doller held a workshop for the holiday program last year at the Shepparton Art Museum. Photo by Cam Matheson With the start of the school holidays, the old question asked by just about every parent with children can be heard: “what am I going to do with the children?” » The Shepparton Art […]]]>

Creatives: Rachel Doller held a workshop for the holiday program last year at the Shepparton Art Museum. Photo by Cam Matheson

With the start of the school holidays, the old question asked by just about every parent with children can be heard: “what am I going to do with the children?” »

The Shepparton Art Museum offers a myriad of activities as part of its winter camp vacation program.

The program will run from Monday, June 27 through Thursday, July 7, and SAM Acting Artistic Director and Chief Engagement Officer Gabriella Calandro says it’s all about “fun and creativity.”

“From a hands-on magic clay workshop where participants will add their creations to our children’s exhibit Liquidarium to collage and comic design for teens, SAM has something for everyone and keeps the minds and hands of young creators occupied during these school holidays,” she said.

The exhibition Liquidarium, now on display in SAM’s Children’s Gallery, was inspired by the wetlands and rivers just outside the art museum.

Melbourne artist Vera Möller hosts two masterclass sessions teaching kids and teens the beauty and fun of diorama making.

There is something for everyone in the program, even toddlers.

A program of sensory games has been designed to help not only develop fine motor skills but also to introduce the little ones to art from an early age.

Aimed at children aged 10 to 15, two workshops exploring the art of comics will be led by Aaron Billings, comics teacher and artist from Melbourne.

The itinerary also includes several SAM staff-led sessions exploring collage and painting for teens, as well as a free screening of The Lorax.

Reservations are encouraged for all programs.

For more information on times, dates and tickets, visit https://sheppartonartmuseum.com.au/whats-on/sam-winter-camp-2/

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Art Museum to Host Third Annual Networking Event https://911gallery.org/art-museum-to-host-third-annual-networking-event/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 13:00:58 +0000 https://911gallery.org/art-museum-to-host-third-annual-networking-event/ The Grand Rapids Art Museum will host a panel discussion with entertainment and networking opportunities for young professionals. The Grand Rapids Art Museum (GRAM) is hosting its third annual Cultivate Grand Rapids event from 7-11 p.m. Saturday, June 25 at 101 Monroe Center St. NW. The event aims to bring together young creatives, entrepreneurs and […]]]>

The Grand Rapids Art Museum will host a panel discussion with entertainment and networking opportunities for young professionals.

The Grand Rapids Art Museum (GRAM) is hosting its third annual Cultivate Grand Rapids event from 7-11 p.m. Saturday, June 25 at 101 Monroe Center St. NW.

The event aims to bring together young creatives, entrepreneurs and professionals aged 21-40 for an evening of learning and networking opportunities.

This year’s event is hosted by Pirate Club, a Grand Rapids team focused on creating collaboration between Grand Rapids artists and creatives. Pirate Club has partnered with GRAM Visionnaires, a collaborative organization of young artists, for Cultivate 2022.

Cultivate 2022 will feature a panel discussion titled “Overcoming Obstacles in Business” moderated by Latesha Lipscomb, founder of cosmetic concierge I GOT FACE. Other panelists include Hannah Berry, founder of the Lions & Rabbits Center for the Arts, Anthony Lazzaro, founder of Friend of a Friend, Jamiel Robinson, founder of Grand Rapids Area Black Businesses, and Peter Jacob, founder of Peter Jacob Kind Creative Design. Firm.

Cultivate will also include Start Garden, a casting call with modeling agency Endless Management, live art installations, a silent auction and raffle, three gallery exhibits and an open bar.

A portion of the proceeds from the event will be donated to Lions & Rabbits, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping artists achieve creative independence through accessible arts education and enrichment programs.

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Fitchburg Art Museum Welcomes Summer With Two New Shows – Lowell Sun https://911gallery.org/fitchburg-art-museum-welcomes-summer-with-two-new-shows-lowell-sun/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:38:02 +0000 https://911gallery.org/fitchburg-art-museum-welcomes-summer-with-two-new-shows-lowell-sun/ Summer has arrived at the Fitchburg Art Museum, with the opening of two highly anticipated shows on Friday, June 24. Until September 5, the “86th Regional Arts and Crafts Exhibition” will showcase the creative works of more than 70 talented artists and artisans from the region. One of New England’s longest-running juried exhibits, the annual […]]]>

Summer has arrived at the Fitchburg Art Museum, with the opening of two highly anticipated shows on Friday, June 24.

Until September 5, the “86th Regional Arts and Crafts Exhibition” will showcase the creative works of more than 70 talented artists and artisans from the region.

One of New England’s longest-running juried exhibits, the annual FAM Showcase celebrates local artists and artisans by providing a museum-like environment for artwork and connecting them with other other artists, patrons and enthusiasts.

It is open to those working in any medium who live or work within 30 miles of Fitchburg. Entrants were invited to submit up to two works of art created within the past two years.

Jameson Johnson, this year’s juror, is founder and editor of the Boston Art Review and head of communications and development at the MIT List Visual Arts Center. Several modest cash prizes are awarded and the first prize winner wins a solo exhibition alongside the 87th Regional Arts and Crafts Exhibition next summer.

Lunenberg artist Bridie Wolejko, last year’s top prize winner, created works for the solo exhibition “Hypnagogia: Bridie Wolejko’s Mixed Media Fantasies.” It is also visible from June 24 to September 24. 4.

Hypnagogia, the transient state of consciousness between wakefulness and sleep, gives many people involuntary and vividly imagined experiences. The artist has created collages and mixed media handicrafts that create dreamlike images based on his interests in myth, magic, horror, popular culture, surrealism, architecture and nature.

Located at 185 Elm Street, FAM is open Wednesday through Friday from noon to 4 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is also open from noon to 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. Call 978-345-4207 or visit www.fitchburgartmuseum.org for more information.

Gallery Notes

Water, water everywhere: two summer exhibitions present water in all its wet glory. “Undercurrents: Water and Human Impact”, on view until August 16 at Concord Art, 37 Lexington Road, Concord, focuses on the effects of climate change on bodies of water as interpreted by artists including the works are presented. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Call 978-369-2578 for more information. Additionally, “Space to Sea,” an exhibit of underwater photographs taken at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, is on view by November 1 at the New England Aquarium. It features 50 of famed underwater photographer Kevin Ellenbogen’s large-scale photos taken to mark the sanctuary’s 30th anniversary. Visit www.neaq.org for more information.

Hansds-on Armor: Knightly armor is beautiful and shiny, but what does it do? How much does it weigh? Is it comfortable? How and why did the knights who wore it decorate it? Find out the answers to these questions and more this weekend at the Worcester Art Museum‘s “Art Cart: Hands-on Armor” activity. The free program with admission to the museum takes place from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday June 25 and 26, in the Medieval Gallery. Visit www.worcesterart.org/events for more information.

At the Greenwald: Lowell multimedia artist Walter Wright is featured in the solo exhibition “Walter Wright Digital Media: Prints & Video,” on view through July 17 at the Greenwald Gallery at the Arts League of Lowell, 307 Market St. He’ll host a workshop from 2-4 p.m. on Saturday, July 2. A reception is scheduled from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday July 16. The gallery is open from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday to Sunday. Visit www.artsleagueoflowell.org for more information.

Nancye Tuttle’s email is nancyedt@verizon.net.

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Eric Rudd: The Berkshire Art Museum reopens with an exhibition of works by artists from the Thursday evening dinner group | theater arts https://911gallery.org/eric-rudd-the-berkshire-art-museum-reopens-with-an-exhibition-of-works-by-artists-from-the-thursday-evening-dinner-group-theater-arts/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://911gallery.org/eric-rudd-the-berkshire-art-museum-reopens-with-an-exhibition-of-works-by-artists-from-the-thursday-evening-dinner-group-theater-arts/ While North Adams predicted a surge of tourists following the huge Mass MoCA project, no one anticipated a surge of artists. Although small and certainly not a major urban arts hub, the city has attracted dozens of artists in recent years who find North Adams an economically feasible yet culturally stimulating alternative to expensive metropolitan […]]]>

While North Adams predicted a surge of tourists following the huge Mass MoCA project, no one anticipated a surge of artists. Although small and certainly not a major urban arts hub, the city has attracted dozens of artists in recent years who find North Adams an economically feasible yet culturally stimulating alternative to expensive metropolitan areas.

The Berkshire Art Museum exhibits artists who have a common interest: dining together on Thursday nights at Meng’s Pan-Asian. There is no artistic style that binds this group. It’s a most unusual excuse for an exhibition, but one that will whet your appetite.

There are examples throughout art history of artists congregating in bars and cafes – Dadaists frequenting the cafes of Zurich, Impressionists and Cubists in various cafes in Paris, and after the WWII Abstract Expressionists gathering in various New York bars. Usually geography and time were the common threads and not necessarily a shared art style. Often the artists were young and not yet famous – or on the verge of success.

When our community-eating started in North Adams, we weren’t as young as the famous artists in Paris or New York. After a decade or two, most of us drifted into the senior category while older transplants expanded our group. It’s common to find 25 to 35 artists – plus art-loving spouses and friends – coming in for a meal and gossip.

In Washington DC, where I grew up, artists met frequently. After gallery openings, hungry artists often headed to Chinatown. Chinese restaurants were affordable and open late – you could even order dinner after midnight. When Barbara and I moved to North Adams in 1990, there was no community of artists until we started the Center for Contemporary Artists (CAC) in the historic Beaver Mill which hosted approximately every summer 100 artists as well as directors of museums/galleries from all over the world. . During my decade as director, the CAC was the hub of the emerging art scene; attending CAC dinners was the way to meet other artists.

Although my addiction to Chinese food remained, ethnic food was limited when we first arrived; there were only a few Chinese choices. A small take-out restaurant on Eagle Street has agreed to provide Chinese vegetables not offered on their menu. When they moved later and had a sit-down restaurant, our friend Peter May used our weekly need for Chinese food to include our informal Spanish-speaking group. As this group dissipated, diners were replaced by artists and other art-loving friends.







Dinners at the table

“Thursday Chinese Dinner Group performers,” before the pandemic, met weekly at Meng Pan-Asian Restaurant in North Adams.




When the restaurant owner changed, artist Wendy James suggested the band move to Peking/Sushi House on Main Street. Joy (co-owner with her chef-husband Meng) assured us that she could supply our requested Chinese dishes. This change of venue has proven incredibly popular with artists.

Over the years dinners have changed usually due to conflicts with group drawing nights – Monday to Wednesday to Thursday. Today, we order separately rather than in a family fashion – especially since margaritas are the most common drink of choice and therefore check quantities vary widely.

When Joy and Meng decided to close Sushi House and remodel the Peking but with a new name and a new look, we suggested using “Pan-Asian” in their name as it represented what they offered – a choice of Chinese, Korean, Thai and Japanese sushi. and noodle dishes. As Meng is the master chef, he became “Meng’s Pan-Asian”.

With the entrance located about 40 feet from the Main Street sidewalk, it was obvious that the large alley wall needed some art to brighten up the pathway. Rather than paying to make new panels, a painting in my studio seemed perfect. Since it had imperfections from the glue process, I was willing to take a chance and install it outside. I also lent small pieces of abstract art to install inside. I thought the restaurant should reflect not only its Asian cuisine, but also the fact that the largest museum of contemporary art in the United States is just around the corner and many Mass MoCA visitors would frequent the restaurant.

I don’t know as many historical examples of older artists gathering in one specific place as we do. This is perhaps one of the benefits of creating in North Adams and why the town has become a mecca for artists; it is much easier to meet and socialize here than in a big metropolis.

The Berkshire Art Museum‘s exhibition, ‘Artists of the Thursday Chinese Dinner Group,’ showcases a variety of artistic styles, which in turn reflect the variety of personalities and interests of a group of artists who simply enjoy dining together. Thursday night.

This exhibition was scheduled for 2020 but was postponed for two years due to Covid-19. The pandemic has also reduced our weekly dinners (the restaurant is currently operating for take-out only) and for most of us this is one of the most missed social gatherings.

Eric Rudd is a sculptor, mixed media artist and founding director of the Berkshire Art Museum. The museum, located in the former First United Methodist Church, was founded by the Barbara and Eric Rudd Art Foundation in 2012 and opened to the public in 2014.

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The Barry Art Museum will receive a major donation from the Waitzer Glass Collection – The Virginian-Pilot https://911gallery.org/the-barry-art-museum-will-receive-a-major-donation-from-the-waitzer-glass-collection-the-virginian-pilot/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 12:37:29 +0000 https://911gallery.org/the-barry-art-museum-will-receive-a-major-donation-from-the-waitzer-glass-collection-the-virginian-pilot/ The Barry Museum of Art at Old Dominion University will receive 165 glass sculptures from the Leah and Richard Waitzer Foundation, more than doubling the museum’s glass collection. The pieces – 20th century and contemporary glass – come from the late couple’s three sons, Eddie, Brad and Scott, directors of the Waitzer Foundation. Former Waitzers […]]]>

The Barry Museum of Art at Old Dominion University will receive 165 glass sculptures from the Leah and Richard Waitzer Foundation, more than doubling the museum’s glass collection.

The pieces – 20th century and contemporary glass – come from the late couple’s three sons, Eddie, Brad and Scott, directors of the Waitzer Foundation.

Former Waitzers were prominent philanthropists and civic leaders, and avid patrons of the arts. They gave generously to the Chrysler Museum of Art, the Virginia Symphony, and Eastern Virginia Medical School. Richard Waitzer died in 2019; Leah Waitzer died in 2021, months after a building named after the family opened at EVMS.

“Leah and Richard were enthusiastic, decisive and skilled collectors, and they taught us a lot,” Barry Museum co-founder Richard Barry said in a statement. His wife, Carolyn, added: “We enjoyed the thrill of hunting with them.”

The gift includes works by some of the best-known names in glass, including Louis Comfort Tiffany, Frederick Carder, Émile Gallé and Nancy Daum Frères. Particular emphasis is placed on early studio glass sculptures, and 12 pieces trace the career of Harvey Littleton, considered the founder of the American Studio Glass movement, which began in the 1960s. Other early innovators and pioneers depicted in the collection are Dominick Labino, Marvin Lipofsky and Toots Zynsky.

“We are thrilled that these remarkable pieces remain here in Hampton Roads on the ODU campus to honor their legacy through education,” said Charlotte Potter Kasic, Executive Director of the Barry Art Museum. “The Waitzers were visionaries – and mentors to many of us in the field. They inspired our own founders and set a precedent for art appreciation across Norfolk and region.

The Barry is planning an exhibition of the Waitzer collection for spring 2023 and will create a gallery dedicated to their philanthropy.

Editor Denise M. Watson contributed to this report.

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300 years of Flemish masterpieces https://911gallery.org/300-years-of-flemish-masterpieces/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:01:25 +0000 https://911gallery.org/300-years-of-flemish-masterpieces/ The Denver Art Museum will collaborate with the Phoebus Foundation to present Saints, Sinners, Lovers, and Fools: 300 Years of Flemish Masterworks, which will open at the Denver Art Museum for the collection’s U.S. debut in fall 2022. The exhibition will present at the American public for the first time to the extensive collection of […]]]>

The Denver Art Museum will collaborate with the Phoebus Foundation to present Saints, Sinners, Lovers, and Fools: 300 Years of Flemish Masterworks, which will open at the Denver Art Museum for the collection’s U.S. debut in fall 2022. The exhibition will present at the American public for the first time to the extensive collection of Flemish art from the 15th to 17th centuries of the Belgium-based Phoebus Foundation, including masterpieces by, among others, Hans Memling, Jan Gossaert, Jan and Catharina van Hemessen, Peter Paul Rubens, Jacob Jordaens and Anthony van Dyck.

Exhibited in the Anschutz and Martin & McCormick Galleries on Level 2 of the Hamilton Building, Saints, Sinners, Lovers and Fools will be on view from October 16, 2022 through January 22, 2023, with admission ticket. This unique display of Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque paintings, sculptures and other objects from the Southern Netherlands is overseen by the Foundation’s Director of Staff and Curator, Dr Katharina Van Cauteren, and Project Coordinator Niels Schalley, and organized for the DAM by the Chief Curator and Curator of European Heritage. Art before 1900 Angelica Daneo.

“This incredible collection of masterpieces is coming to the United States for the first time,” said Christoph Heinrich, director of Frederick and Jan Mayer of DAM. “Engaging visitors of all ages in these works is a top priority, and guests will discover the unexpected in the art installation and the gallery‘s immersive experiences will hopefully draw parallels between the social history of 15th and 17th century Flanders and our world today.”

At DAM, curator Angelica Daneo and interpretive specialist Lauren Thompson created curatorial and interpretive narratives for the Denver presentation that draw on the thematic directions developed by Van Cauteren to guide visitors.

“Saints, Sinners, Lovers, and Fools offers insight into the specific subjects and styles adopted by artists from the Southern Netherlands between the 15th and 17th centuries, providing important connections to the society and culture of the time” , said Daneo. “We hope that visitors will gain insight into the development of styles, subjects and techniques across these crucial three centuries and have fun exploring the exhibit’s unique design and approach.”

Saints, Sinners, Lovers, and Fools progresses through six sections, beginning with “God is in the Details”, introducing religious subjects as a primary focus for artists of the time. Works such as Hans Memling’s Birth of Christ and Pieter Coecke van Aelst’s Triptych testify to the extraordinary attention to detail and devotional imagery that artists and patrons favored at the time. Sacred figures were now presented as flesh-and-blood human beings in familiar, contemporary settings.

The next section entitled “From God to the Individual” aims to show the rise of individual consciousness and confidence, resulting in the creation of ambitious portraits celebrating the models’ wealth and status in society. Double Portrait of Jan Sanders van Hemessen and Portrait of der Burch by Jan van Scorel.

It is conveniently followed by a set devoted to the theme of human madness; the section titled “The Fool in the Mirror” features images and compositions popular at the time: whimsical, sarcastic and, at the same time, poignant in their critique of human presumption. These scenes, often hilarious, full of jokes, pranks and witty double meanings, were intended to shine a light on the greed, lust and other follies of human life and, ultimately, to discourage a sinful existence.

The ‘Discovering the World’ section focuses on the belief, adopted by the Flemings at the time, that to understand the mysteries of the divine, one had to explore the wider world. Every detail of creation deserved to be examined, felt, described and studied, and as a result countless scientific disciplines developed. Artists from the southern Netherlands responded to these developments, incorporating new findings into their technique and subject matter. Nature became a playground for increasingly inquisitive scientists, who developed microscopes and telescopes, compasses and quadrants, as well as for artists, who found countless motifs for their subjects there.

In “A world in turmoil”, the historical context of the Eighty Years’ War (1568-1648), the conflict between the Netherlands and Spain, will help our visitors to understand the reasons for the adoption, by artists such as Rubens and Van Dyck, of an emotional approach to painting, where religious scenes were meant to move and overwhelm the viewer, thus securing allegiance to the Catholic faith, embraced by Spanish rulers.

The last section, entitled “The Pursuit of Wonder”, intends to recreate a “Wunderkammer”, or “Chamber of Wonders”: shells, corals, rare animals, scientific instruments and precious stones, fashionable art and rare antiquities: collectors have sought to collect and organize these “curiosities” as representative objects of the known world, as well as the unknown, proving their success and displaying their newly acquired status. These objects will be presented as an immersive experience, which is also the culmination of the visitor’s journey through the exhibition. The Wunderkammer exhibition benefited from a collaboration with the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, which generously loaned natural objects from their collections.

Saints, Sinners, Lovers and Fools will visit the Dallas Museum of Art from February 19, 2023 through June 25, 2023.

Saints, Sinners, Lovers, and Fools: 300 Years of Flemish Masterworks is co-organized by the Denver Art Museum and the Phoebus Foundation, Antwerp (Belgium). It is presented by the Birnbaum Social Discourse Project. Support is provided by the Tom Taplin Jr. and Ted Taplin, Keith and Kathie Finger Endowment, the Kristin and Charles Lohmiller Exhibitions Fund, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, Christie’s, the fund’s annual leadership campaign donors and residents which support the Department of Scientific and Cultural Facilities (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.The Denver Art Museum and the Phoebus Foundation present SAINTS, SINNERS, LOVERS, AND FOOLS: 300 Years of Flemish Masterworks

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The Frist Art Museum extends its opening hours and public programming https://911gallery.org/the-frist-art-museum-extends-its-opening-hours-and-public-programming/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 04:44:20 +0000 https://911gallery.org/the-frist-art-museum-extends-its-opening-hours-and-public-programming/ The Frist Art Museum will restore its opening hours to Thursday evenings and Mondays. From June 16, the galleries will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursdays and will be free for middle school students with proof of payment from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Starting June 20, Monday hours will be […]]]>

The Frist Art Museum will restore its opening hours to Thursday evenings and Mondays. From June 16, the galleries will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursdays and will be free for middle school students with proof of payment from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Starting June 20, Monday hours will be 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

On Thursday evening, the Frist will once again offer public programming and event opportunities. “As opening hours increase, we look forward to expanding access and learning opportunities for guests of all ages and backgrounds,” said Frist Art Museum Executive Director and CEO, Seth Feman. “Through public programming, we will continue to explore creative connections in our Middle Tennessee community to help visitors engage with the exhibits in new ways.”

Interpretation director Meagan Rust, who oversees the Frist’s public programs, said there will now be more opportunities for guests to connect with fellow art lovers, with something different planned every week. “For Thursdays, we’re very excited to bring back activities more suited to the evening hours like live music, film screenings, tours, art-making activities, gallery programs, themed food tastings and drinks, and more. month, we also look forward to activating our Turner Courtyard space with activities and offers for our guests.”

The Martin ArtQuest Gallery (MAQ) and Frist Art Museum Gift Shop will also be open Mondays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Grams Coffee and Tea and The Southern V, currently serving the Frist Art Museum Café, will be open during all opening hours.

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5 things to know about the Philly Art Museum’s new director https://911gallery.org/5-things-to-know-about-the-philly-art-museums-new-director/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 19:24:26 +0000 https://911gallery.org/5-things-to-know-about-the-philly-art-museums-new-director/ 3. Suda has a dog named Phil Collins, a point of contention with her husband who is a Peter Gabriel fan. Suda and her family (a husband and two children) adopted a Portuguese Water Dog and named it after the leader of the band Genesis. Collins, of course, had replaced the band’s original singer, Peter […]]]>

3. Suda has a dog named Phil Collins, a point of contention with her husband who is a Peter Gabriel fan.

Suda and her family (a husband and two children) adopted a Portuguese Water Dog and named it after the leader of the band Genesis.

Collins, of course, had replaced the band’s original singer, Peter Gabriel, who left in 1975 to pursue a successful solo career.

“We had a little argument with my husband, who was a Peter Gabriel fan, which, you know, I still judge him to this day,” Suda said.

She could try to reform the group.

“We are looking to get a second dog and I may have to pay the price, and the next dog may be Peter Gabriel,” she said. “But we’ll see.”

4. Suda was a unionized museum worker and says she can negotiate terms out of court with the PMA union.

“I was a proud member of the union at the Art Gallery of Ontario,” said Suda, who previously worked as assistant curator, then curator of European art and curator of prints and drawings at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Toronto.

In his current position, the National Gallery of Canada has two unions: one for curators and another for wall-to-wall workers in many departments.

“We worked well together. It hasn’t always been easy. I think that’s the point,” Suda said. “It may not always be an easy conversation, but it is meant to be generative and productive and for the betterment of everyone who works at the Museum.

In 2020, workers at the Philadelphia Museum of Art formed a union, but have yet to finalize their first contract. If negotiations are not concluded between the union and management before Suda becomes director this fall, the union will have gone more than two years without a contract.

She said she was looking forward to bargaining with the PMA union.

“The thing is, you can kind of push each other and make sure you get to the best place,” she said.

5. Suda plans to turn the Philadelphia Museum of Art “upside down.”

Suda’s predecessor at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Timothy Rub, led the institution for 13 years, during which time the museum underwent a massive physical reconstruction: a half-billion-dollar project with the architect Frank Gehry to rip the interior of the museum apart and sew everything together, creating an additional 90,000 square feet of underground space.

“It’s amazing. I feel so lucky to come on the heels of such a massive capital project,” Suda said. “It’s not just a big construction project, it’s it’s really about looking after the inside of a building and getting it ready for further expansion when we’re ready, and doing it in a beautiful way with a world-leading architect.”

Over the next two to three years, Suda said it will be committed to developing a culture of collaboration among workers internally and opening up to the community outside.

“To really invite all of Philadelphia to be part of this project with us,” she said. “There is this internal work, but I think it’s like turning the institution upside down, so that Philadelphia and the stakeholders for whom we exist, the communities for which we aspire to be part of this community, can help us, encourage us, help create this momentum.

Suda said she was particularly interested in building deeper relationships with area schools.

“Arts education is not something anyone can just assume their kids will get,” Suda said. “There is this incredible resource here, with this rich tradition of reaching out to school children. It’s something that I feel really passionate about about our future.

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